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October 20th, 2014

Herve This Is Bringing Note-by-Note Cooking to the USA!



Herve This, Note-by-Note Cooking

After spending a week reading about Herve This’s Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food, now’s your chance to see the dynamic chemist as he comes to New York and Boston for a series of great events, beginning this Friday!:

Friday, October 24 at 6:00 pm
Boston University Jacques Pepin Lecture Series in Gastronomy and Experiential Food Studies

Saturday, October 25, 2014 at 12:30 pm
Boston Book Festival/Alliance Francaise de Boston

Monday, October 27, 2014 at 6:00 pm
Columbia University Maison Française
Columbia University’s Maison Française presents Herve This, Michael Laiskonis, and Adam Gopnik in conversation.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 6:00 pm
Albertine Bookstore at the French Embassy
The discussion will be followed by a tasting prepared by Chef and Creative Director of the Institute of Culinary, Michael Laiskonis.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 at 1:00 pm
Institute for Culinary Education

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm
Experimental Cuisine Collective at New York University

Friday, October 31, 2014 at 12:00 PM
Culinary Institute of America

October 20th, 2014

Book Givewaway! Berkshire Beyond Buffett



This week our featured book is Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values by Lawrence Cunningham.

In addition to featuring the book and the author on the blog, we will also be posting about the book on twitter, and facebook. You can also follow news about the book on the Columbia Business School Publishing twitter page.

We are also offering a FREE copy of Berkshire Beyond Buffett to a lucky winner. To enter the contest please e-mail pl2164@columbia.edu and include your name and address. The winner will be selected Friday, October 24 at 1:00 pm.

Berkshire Hathaway, the $300 billion conglomerate that Warren Buffett built, is among the world’s largest and most famous corporations. Yet, for all its power and celebrity, few people understand Berkshire, and many assume it cannot survive without Buffett. This book proves that assumption wrong.

In a comprehensive portrait of the distinct corporate culture that unites and sustains Berkshire’s fifty direct subsidiaries, Lawrence A. Cunningham unearths the traits that assure the conglomerate’s perpetual prosperity. Riveting stories recount each subsidiary’s origins, triumphs, and journey to Berkshire and reveal the strategies managers use to generate economic value from intangible values, such as thrift, integrity, entrepreneurship, autonomy, and a sense of permanence.

October 17th, 2014

Video: Herve This takes us into His Lab to Show Us Note-By-Note Cooking



We conclude our week-long feature on Note-by-Note Cuisine: The Future of Food, by Hervé This, with this great video via the BBC. This takes us into his lab/kitchen to discuss and show us how to cook using the principles of note-by-note cooking and how to employ compounds into your dishes! Happy viewing and Bon Appétit!

October 17th, 2014

Around 1948 with Khalidi, Liu, Moyn, and Nelson



An event last week at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute brought together a fascinating panel to discuss the advent and the global impact of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Fittingly titled “Around 1948: Human Rights and Global Transformation,” the panel discussion included four prominent authors from a variety of fields (they also all happen to be Columbia University Press authors): Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies, Columbia University; Lydia H. Liu, Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University; Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law and History, Harvard University; and Deborah Nelson, Associate Professor of English, University of Chicago.

Here is the video from the panel discussion:

October 16th, 2014

Herve This on Why Note-by-Note Cooking Is Good for the Future of Food



“Thanks to note-by-note cooking, we have a whole new slew of cooking possibilities in front of us as well as new consistencies, new odors, new tastes, and new flavors.”—Hervé This

Herve This, Note-by-Note CookingThe following is a post by Hervé This, author of Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food. (For more on the book, you can also read an excerpt or an interview with Hervé This):

Fittingly, Columbia University Press added “the future of food” on the cover of my new book since note-by-note cooking is truly the future of food and more and more chefs are exploring and employing its techniques in their cooking.

If you look to the current developments of culinary art, you don’t see much novelty except note-by-note cooking. Wild plants? The eminent French chef Michel Michel Bras has been cooking them for decades. Molecular cooking? Even if you call it “science-based cooking”, or “modernist cooking”, or “techno-emotional cooking” (what is this need to give more names when one was already given?), that was proposed as early as the 1980′s!

Yes, there is no newer proposal for culinary art than note-by-note cooking, and we are living a very exciting time. Thanks to note-by-note cooking, we have a whole new slew of cooking possibilities in front of us as well as new consistencies, new odors, new tastes, and new flavors.

Read the rest of this entry »

October 15th, 2014

Meet Eric Schwartz, Our New Editorial Director!



Eric Schwartz, Editorial DirectorWe are pleased to announce that Eric Schwartz joined the Press as Editorial Director on Monday, September 29. He replaces Jennifer Crewe, who was promoted to President and Director of the Press in June.

Eric was Senior Editor for Sociology and Cognitive Science at Princeton University Press, a job he has held since 2008. During that time he established a new list in cognitive science and revitalized the sociology list, turning it into one of the top lists in the field. Before moving to Princeton he was psychology editor at Cambridge University Press. He started his career at Springer as a manufacturing assistant and Oxford University Press as manufacturing controller. He became production controller at Cambridge and moved into the editorial department in 2006. Along the way he earned a Ph.D. in political science from the New School for Social Research. His BA, in international relations, is from the University of Delaware. Eric has been active with the Association of American University Presses and the Bookbinder’s Guild of New York.

Eric will start a sociology list at Columbia University Press and build upon the existing list in neuroscience, which was created by the Publisher for Life Sciences.

Eric says, “I am thrilled by the opportunity to work for New York City’s premier university press. It has an engaged and enthusiastic staff, starting with its new President and Director. I’m looking forward to collaborating with Columbia University’s wider academic community on publishing great books. Let’s get started!”

Jennifer Crewe says, “I am delighted that Eric will join the Press to lead our already strong editorial team to even greater heights and augment our lists in two areas of strength at the university.”

October 15th, 2014

Interview with Herve This, author of “Note-by-Note Cooking”



Herve This, Note-By-Note CookingThe following is an interview with Hervé This, author of Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food:

“All food is ‘artificial’! Do you think that barbecue meat hangs ‘naturally’ on the trees of the wild forest?”—Hervé This

Question: How does note-by-note cooking differ from molecular gastronomy?

Herve This: Molecular gastronomy is a scientific activity, not to be confused with molecular cooking. Indeed, molecular gastronomy, being science, has nothing to do with cooking. In other words, science is not about making dishes. Science looks for the mechanism of phenomena. That’s all. And technology uses the results of science to improve technique. So, note-by-note cooking is a technique.

Another question could be, how is note-by-note cooking different from molecular cooking? And here the answer would be that the definition of molecular cooking is “to cook using modern tools” (such as siphons, liquid nitrogen, etc.). But you still use meat, vegetables, etc. However, with note-by-note cooking, the instruments are not important, and the big revolution is to cook with pure compounds, instead of meat, vegetables, fruits, eggs, etc.

Q: Where does the name Note-by-Note Cooking come from?

HT: In 1999, when I introduced the name “molecular cooking,” I was upset, because it was a bad choice, which had to be made for many complex reasons. Unfortunately, people now confuse molecular gastronomy and molecular cooking. So, For note-by-note cooking, I wanted a name that could appeal to artists and it’s fair to say that note-by-note cooking is comparable to a term such as electro-acoustic music.

Q: Won’t not-by-note cooking produce artificial forms of food?

HT: Yes, but all food is “artificial”! Do you think that barbecue meat hangs “naturally” on the trees of the wild forest? Or that French fries appear suddenly from potatoes? No, you need a cook, to make them. In ordinary language, “natural” means “what was not transformed by human beings”, and “artificial” means that it was transformed, it was the result of human “art”.

Instead of “artificial,” it is better to think of “synthetic”, and again in this sense, note by note is synthetic in a similar way as electro-acoustic music. But just listen to the radio and synthesizers are everywhere, often with sometimes beautiful sounds. Moreover, in art, the scope of what is possibile increases with more choices. And more choice is better!

Read the rest of this entry »

October 15th, 2014

New Book Tuesday (Wednesday Edition): The New Censorship, The Philosopher’s Plant and More!



Our weekly listing of new titles now available:

The New Censorship, Joel SimonThe New Censorship: Inside the Global Battle for Media Freedom
Joel Simon

The Philosopher’s Plant: An Intellectual Herbarium
Michael Marder

Choreographies of Shared Sacred Sites: Religion, Politics, and Conflict Resolution
Edited by Elazar Barkan and Karen Barkey

Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu’s Unifying Buddhist Philosophy
Jonathan C. Gold

Community Economic Development in Social Work
Steven D. Soifer, Joseph B. McNeely, Cathy Costa, and Nancy Pickering-Bernheim

The Cinema of Clint Eastwood: Chronicles of America
David Sterritt

October 14th, 2014

Book Giveaway! Win a Free Copy of “Note-by-Note Cooking” by Herve This



Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food, Hervé ThisThis week our featured book is Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food by Hervé This.

In addition to featuring the book and the author on the blog, we will also be posting about the book on twitter, and facebook.

We are also offering a FREE copy of Note-by-Note Cooking to a lucky winner. To enter the contest please e-mail pl2164@columbia.edu and include your name and address. The winner will be selected Friday, October 17 at 1:00 pm.

Note-by-Note Cooking is a landmark in the annals of gastronomy, liberating cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients and methods through the use of pure molecular compounds. Hervé This clearly explains the properties of naturally occurring and synthesized compounds, dispels a host of misconceptions about the place of chemistry in cooking, and shows why note-by-note cooking is an obvious—and inevitable—extension of his earlier pioneering work in molecular gastronomy.

Read an excerpt from the introduction, “Why the Need for Note-by-Note Cooking Should be Obvious”:

October 10th, 2014

Joseph Stiglitz and Bruce Greenwald discuss the idea of a learning society



Creating a Learning Society

In a recent event at the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, Joseph Stiglitz and Bruce Greenwald discussed the ideas from their recent book, Creating a Learning Society: A New Approach to Growth, Development, and Social Progress. You can read the Heyman Center’s description of the panel and view a video below.

It has long been recognized that an improved standard of living results from advances in technology, not from the accumulation of capital. It has also become clear that what truly separates developed from less-developed countries is not just a gap in resources or output but a gap in knowledge. In fact, the pace at which developing countries grow is largely a function of the pace at which they close that gap.

Thus, to understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy. Taking as a starting point Kenneth J. Arrow’s 1962 paper “Learning by Doing,” they explain why the production of knowledge differs from that of other goods and why market economies alone typically do not produce and transmit knowledge efficiently. Closing knowledge gaps and helping laggards learn are central to growth and development. But creating a learning society is equally crucial if we are to sustain improved living standards in advanced countries.

The Disciplines Series: The Idea of Development The Learning Society with Joseph Stiglitz and Bruce Greenwald from Heyman Center/Society of Fellows on Vimeo.

October 10th, 2014

Interview with Amrita Pande, author of Wombs in Labor



Wombs in LaborThe following is an interview with Amrita Pande, author of Wombs in Labor: Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India:

What made a sociologist choose a topic like surrogacy?
Well, it started with a short newspaper article I read in 2006. Surrogacy was still at its infancy in India and the article – just about 400 words – described it as India’s new form of outsourcing. This newsarticle really unsettled me. Flashes of Canadian feminist Margaret Atwood’s book The Handmaid’s Tale passed through my mind, where a class of women is valued merely as breeders of children of the privileged race and class. I was then a doctoral student at UMASS Amherst and I have to confess the idea that my country would now be stereotyped as a land of not just child laborers, and “slumdogs” but also baby farms made me very queasy! After some quick digging around, I realized that there was no research (academic or otherwise) on this rather critical issue. So began my ethnographic journey into the first country in the global south to have a flourishing industry in both national and transnational surrogacy. Read the rest of this entry »

October 9th, 2014

Interview with John Roberts, author of Photography and Its Violations



“Photography violates, precisely, because social appearances hide, in turn, division, hierarchy and exclusion.”—John Roberts

John Roberts, Photography and Its ViolationsThe following is an interview with John Roberts, author of Photography and Its Violations:

Q: What do you mean by photography and its violations? How is photography violated?

John Roberts: Well, the title is deliberately ambiguous. By violation I do not mean the capacity of photography to objectify its subjects, nor am I referring directly—although it is implied—to those cultural and political forces lined up against its interests. Rather violation refers here to what photography is able to do in an expressly productive way, given what I call in the book, its social ontology or “unquenchable social intrusiveness and invasiveness.” By this I mean, what makes photography worth returning to as a philosophical and political problem is, in fact, the thing that has always threatened its desire to be thought highly of as an art or would be “objective” medium: namely its unstable and destabilizing character. That is, photography is not just a medium of report or an aesthetic transformation of the world, but a specific act of disclosure, in which its rebarbative powers—of disruption, denaturalization and the ruination of self-identity—secure photography’s infinite capacity for truth telling.

Hence when I talk of violation I’m addressing how photography’s intrusive “pointing to” opens up a space of conceptual reflection on the relations between the photograph’s subjects and objects and the social world in which they are embedded. As such, my understanding of violation takes an interrelated form: violation is what the act of photography does in the world as a consequence of the fact that photography’s relationship to its depicted subjects and objects is an effect of power relations and material interests external to the act of photography itself. The truth-claims of photography, therefore, are a condition of this conceptual articulation. As I say: “Photography violates, precisely, because social appearances hide, in turn, division, hierarchy and exclusion.”

Read the rest of this entry »

October 8th, 2014

America’s Surging Rivers — A Post by Daniel McCool



Daniel McCool, River RepublicThe following is a post by Daniel McCool, author of River Republic: The Fall and Rise of America’s Rivers:

The movement to restore America’s rivers has seen tremendous progress in the last two years. The restoration of the Elwha River is nearing completion. Two dams, Elwha and Glines Canyon, were successfully removed by the summer of 2014, and salmon are already repopulating the river. The restoration of the Elwha required more than two decades of unyielding effort by restoration “instigators” (people I profile in River Republic), and their persistence finally paid off. The Elwha will undoubtedly become a model for other large restoration projects.

Another big victory occurred when a massive hole was blasted through Condit Dam on the White Salmon River; the dramatic blast and subsequent reservoir draining can be seen in a video produced for National Geographic:

Read the rest of this entry »

October 8th, 2014

Interview with Natalie Berkowitz, author of “The Winemaker’s Hand”



Natalie Berkowitz, The Winemaker's HandThe following is an interview with Natalie Berkowitz, author of The Winemaker’s Hand: Conversations on Talent, Technique, and Terroir:

Question: You obviously talked to many different winemakers for your book, were there particular approaches to the craft that united them all?

Natalie Berkowitz: I’ve always marveled at the diversity of human creativity. Generations of artists used the same colors but their paintings represent their personal visions. The concept compelled me to write The Winemaker’s Hand. Unlike consistent products like Coca Cola, Tropicana Orange Juice and Heinz Ketchup, wine lovers are treated to a plethora of wines from different regions crafted from an amazing number of varietals.

The Winemaker’s Hand is a compilation of conversations with more than 40 vintners from many viticultural regions around the world. They reveal how all winemakers wrest with their soils and the forces of nature, (or terroir) to create a wine that represents their individual talents, passions, expertise, vision, philosophy, and historical traditions. All these factors are integral to what goes into a bottle of wine. After all, the grapes don’t jump into the bottles themselves, it’s what makes winemaking both and art and a science.

Q: Are there new technologies that are currently changing the way in which wine is made?

NB: Because of new technologies, wine has improved around the world since the last part of the 20th century: steel fermentation tanks, better barrels, more comprehensive information from chemical analysis, and a better understanding of which varietals fare better in different terrors. Winemakers are generous souls, willing to share ideas about new technologies with their peers.

Read the rest of this entry »

October 7th, 2014

New Book Tuesday: Chop Suey, Global Terrorism, and More New Books!



Chop Suey, Yong ChenOur weekly listing of new titles now available:

Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America
Yong Chen

The Evolution of the Global Terrorist Threat: From 9/11 to Osama bin Laden’s Death
Edited by Bruce Hoffman and Fernando Reinares

When the Future Disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea
Janet Poole

Social Inquiry After Wittgenstein and Kuhn: Leaving Everything as It Is
John G. Gunnell

Social Work: Value-Guided Practice for a Global Society
Cynthia Bisman

October 6th, 2014

This Week’s Author Events — Blood, The Hockey Stick, Vital Conversations, Lady in the Dark, and More!



Blood, Gil AnidjarOctober brings a great lineup of author events and this week is no exception. Here’s a look:

Monday, October 6:

Gabriel Rockhill discusses his book Radical History and the Politics of Art at the Slought Foundation in Philadelphia.

Tuesday, October 7:

Gil Anidjar talks about Blood: A Critique of Christianity with Mark C. Taylor at Bookculture in New York City.

Wednesday, October 8:

Robert Sitton on Lady in the Dark: Iris Barry and the Art of Film at The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford Connecticut.

Nancy Foner, editor of One Out of Three: Immigrant New York in the Twenty-First Century, joins others to discuss contemporary immigration in New York City at the Tenement Museum in New York City.

A book release party for Vital Conversations: Improving Communication Between Doctors and Patients, by Dennis Rosen at Newtonville Books.

Read the rest of this entry »

October 6th, 2014

The Cinema of Alexander Sokurov



In the following video, Jeremi Szaniawski talks with Dominique Nasta (ULB) about his book The Cinema of Alexander Sokurov: Figures of Paradox:

October 3rd, 2014

How Poverty and Income Disparities Influences Doctor-Patient Relations — Dennis Rosen



Dennis Rosen, Vital ConversationsWe conclude our week-long feature on Vital Conversations: Improving Communication Between Doctors and Patients, with an excerpt from the book in which Dennis Rosen explores how socioeconomic disparities affect communication between doctor and patient:

Even when socioeconomic disparities between physician and patient are not glaringly obvious, they can and often do heavily influence the quality of physician-patient communication during the visit as well as its outcomes. Researchers have found that patients from lower socio­economic backgrounds tend to participate less in medical decision making, which … results in lower adherence and higher overall health-care costs. These patients are also generally provided with less information and socioemotional support by their physicians. In contrast, patients from higher socio­economic backgrounds tend to be much more involved in the man­agement of their own care. There are many possible explanations for this, including societal boundaries that limit the scope of communi­cation between people of different social stations and differences in education levels that can impede the ability of physician and patient to find a common language. Whatever the reasons, however, the fact remains that some patients are consistently less engaged by physicians than others, with consequent effects upon their participation in defin­ing the parameters of their care and, ultimately, their adherence with the treatment.

Disparities in socioeconomic status can also have profound effects on how disease is contextualized and understood. In some cases, these can lead to active resistance on the part of patients to public-health disease prevention and treatment efforts. Marilyn Nations of Har­vard and Cristina Monte of the Federal University of Ceara Medi­cal School, Brazil, interviewed the indigent residents of two favelas (shantytowns) that were hit hard by the 1993 cholera epidemic. Their aim was to understand more fully why there had been such a high degree of resistance by the favelados to governmental efforts to control the outbreak, such as water purification and the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Nations and Monte confirmed that in many instances the favelados’ refusal to cooperate with the campaign was a response to a longstanding sense of marginalization and stigmatization, which was potentiated by the use of certain metaphors in the prevention cam­paign that seemed to blame them for becoming sick in the first place. By rejecting the government-sponsored prevention efforts, the fave­lados were also rejecting the stigma of being made responsible for the epidemic.

Read the rest of this entry »

October 2nd, 2014

A Doctor, a Rabbi and a Chicken — Dennis Rosen



“Deeply held beliefs .. need not only to be recognized and respected, but also integrated into the therapeutic approach in order for treatment to succeed. It is a lesson that has served me well, and which has helped me to serve so many others over the years.”—Dennis Rosen, MD

Dennis Rosen, Vital ConversationsIn a recent New York Times op-ed entitled A Doctor, a Rabbi and a Chicken, Dennis Rosen, the author of Vital Conversations: Improving Communication Between Doctors and Patients, explores an odd yet pivotal moment in his medical career.

While working in a hospital in Israel, Rosen explained to the son of 75-year-old stroke victim what lay ahead for his father in terms of rehabilitation. The son then asked if a rabbi could enter his father’s hospital room. While such a request might not have been strange, what was different was that when the rabbi walked in the room he was carrying a live chicken and then proceeded to wave it above the patient’s head.

Rosen learned that it was a custom of the local Persian-Jewish community to help heal the sick. In describing the experience, Rosen writes:

I was very impressed by how deftly the son was able to maneuver between two very different belief systems explaining his father’s disease and paths towards possible recovery: biomedical and religious. As evidenced from our repeated discussions about tests and treatment plans for his father, he clearly understood — and valued — what modern medicine could offer. And yet, his belief in Divine mercy and intercession was unshakeable….

Read the rest of this entry »

October 2nd, 2014

Thursday Fiction Corner: Interview with Adda Djorup, a Contributor to Best European Fiction 2015



Best European Fiction 2015The 2015 edition of Dalkey Archive Press’s popular Best European Fiction is now available. The following is an interview with Adda Djorup, who wrote the story “Birds” as the Danish contribution to the volume:

Question: You have lived in a number of countries, including Spain and Italy. Have those experiences affected your writing? Do you feel that there is a “European Fiction”, or do you notice differences in each literary community?

Adda Djorup: Living outside of my own country has certainly affected my writing. Naturally all writing begins with observing and reflecting. When I place myself out side of my usual geographic and cultural context, I feel that it sharpens my observations, not only of the things that are culturally different than what I am used to, but also of the things that are universal. I feel that there is both a ’European’ fiction and differences in each literary community. Or to put it differently: I feel that any book simultaneously belong to several communities. That’s the beauty of literary fiction – it belongs to individual readers, nations and languages, and it also transcends borders between individuals, nations and languages.

Q: How important is it to you to be translated into English?

AD: I am very happy to be translated into English. I love the process of writing itself, but I’d also really like for my texts to be read – if they weren’t it would feel like talking into a void. And I’m always happy when people care to tell me how they read my work. Besides I have a lot of friends who speak English but not Danish. Now I will be able to show them some more of my work in a qualified translation.

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