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Archive for the 'Awards' Category

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

“Interracial Couples, Intimacy, and Therapy” Wins a “50 Books | 50 Covers”

Congratulations to Jordan Wannemacher and the amazing Columbia University Press design department for their design of Interracial Couples, Intimacy, and Therapy: Crossing Racial Borders, by Kyle D. Killian, which was recently selected as one of the 50 Books | 50 Covers by The Design Observer Group.

And, here’s the cover:

Kyle Killian, Interracial Couples

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

Abominable Science! Wins a AAUP Design Award!

Congratulations to designer Philip Pascuzzo and our design department for winning an AAUP award for best book jacket for Abominable Science!: Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids by Daniel Loxton and Donald R. Prothero.

Needless to say, we agree with the AAUP but don’t take their, or our, word for it, here’s the cover:

Abominable Science, Daniel Loxton, Donald Prothero

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Theodore de Bary Wins a National Humanities Medal

Ted De BaryCongratulations to Wm. Theodore De Bary, on winning a National Humanities Medal. De Bary is an esteemed professor of Asian Studies at Columbia University and a longtime Columbia University Press author and editor of our various Sources of Asian civilization books.

From the official citation honoring the medalists:

William Theodore de Bary, East Asian Studies scholar, for broadening our understanding of the world. Dr. de Bary’s efforts to foster a global conversation have underscored how the common values and experiences shared by Eastern and Western cultures can be used to bridge our differences and build trust.

De Bary’s most recent book with the Press is The Great Civilized Conversation: Education for a World Community and he has written or edited 26 other books for the press.

In celebration of this award we would like to offer a 30% discount on all of De Bary’s books. Please use the discount code CUP30 in the shopping cart to save.

Monday, May 5th, 2014

Design Winners from the 2014 New York Book Show!

We were very excited to hear that four of our books were winners in the 2014 New York Book Show. Sponsored by the Book Industry Guild of New York, the award honors, and celebrates excellence in book production and design. Here are the covers of our winning titles:

The Homoerotics of Orientalism
Joseph Boone
Joseph Boone, The Homoerotics of Orientalism
View the interior.

Abominable Science!: Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids
Daniel Loxton and Donald R. Prothero
Daniel Loxton, Abominable Science
View the interior.

(more…)

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Choice Selects 9 Columbia University Press Titles as Outstanding Academic Titles for 2013

Stanley Aronowitz, C. Wright Mills

Every year Choice editors single out for recognition the most significant print and electronic works reviewed in Choice during the previous calendar year. Appearing annually in Choice‘s January issue this list of publications reflects the best in scholarly titles. We were very happy to learn that 9 Columbia University Press titles were selected:

Taking It Big: C. Wright Mills and the Making of Political Intellectuals
Stanley Aronowitz

Evolutionary Perspectives on Pregnancy
John C. Avise

CIAO: Columbia International Affairs Online

China’s Uncertain Future
Jean-Luc Domenach

Sources of Vietnamese Tradition
Edited by George Dutton, Jayne Werner, and John K. Whitmore

Terrorism and Counterintelligence: How Terrorist Groups Elude Detection
Blake W. Mobley

Imaginary Ethnographies: Literature, Culture, and Subjectivity
Gabriele Schwab

Moving Data: The iPhone and the Future of Media
Edited by Pelle Snickars and Patrick Vonderau

Mission Revolution: The U.S. Military and Stability Operations
Jennifer Taw

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

Sera Young, author of Craving Earth, wins 2013 Margaret Mead Award

Craving Earth, Sera Young

Columbia University Press is pleased to announce that Sera Young, a research scientist in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University, is the recipient of the prestigious Margaret Mead award for her book, Craving Earth: Understanding Pica–the Urge to Eat Clay, Starch, Ice, and Chalk.

This year, Young was selected as the winner for addressing a unique topic of pica which revolves around the consumption of atypical foods such as clay, chalk and ice and how this affects our bodies. Through Young’s multidisciplinary research, she discovered that eating such earthy foods transcends borders and cultures. In addition, these foods may aid the body in some respects of detoxification but also lead to problems such as anemia.

Apart from writing about pica, Young is currently researching the effects of food insecurity among HIV-infected families in sub-Saharan Africa. The Cornell Chronicle also highlights the significance of this award with respect to its namesake, Margaret Mead. “The award celebrates skills similar to those displayed by Margaret Mead, who had a talent for fine scholarship and for making anthropology accessible to a wider general audience.”

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Atlas by Dung Kai-cheung wins Science Fiction & Fantasy Translation Award

“It is the task of literature to make visible the invisible.”—Dung Kai-cheung

Atlas: Archaeology of an Imaginary City, Dung Kai-cheung
We don’t publish a lot of science fiction, so we hope you will indulge us in our excitement in announcing the news of Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City, by Dung Kai-cheung (translated from the Chinese by Anders Hansson, Bonnie S. McDougall, and the author), winning the Science Fiction and Fantasy Translation Award.

In praising the book jurist Alexis Brooks wrote, “Dung Kai-cheung’s amazingly yearning creation of short chapters toys with conceptions of place and being, with feeling and mythmaking, centered in the fictional story of one of the most painfully politicized cities still in existence in the world.”

While Kathryn Morrow, co-chair of the competition, praised the translation: “A masterwork on the nature of translation itself. The prose is beautifully rendered into English, and the author’s essential subject is the process by which myth, legend, and fact translate themselves into human cultural artifacts.”

For more on the book here is an excerpt from the book’s preface:

There are enough fictitious Hong Kongs circulating around the world. It doesn’t matter so much how real or false these fictions are but how they are made up. The Hong Kong of Tai-Pan and Suzie Wong, a mixture of economic adventures, political intrigues, sexual encounters, and romances; the Hong Kong of Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, and Jet Li kung fu fighting their way through to the international scene; the Hong Kong of John Woo’s gangster heroes shooting doublehanded and Stephen Chow’s underdog antiheroes making nonsensical jokes. And yet, in spite of these eye-catching exposures, Hong Kong remains invisible. A large part of the reality of life here is unrepresented, unrevealed, and ignored. Hong Kong’s martial arts fiction, commercial movies, and pop songs are successful in East Asia and even farther abroad, but for all the talents, insights, and creativity of its writers, Hong Kong literature attracts minimal attention—not just internationally but even in mainland China. I am not claiming that literature represents a Hong Kong more real than the movies, but it has its unique role and methods and thus yields different meanings. It is not just a different way of world-representing but also a different way of world-building, that is, creating conditions for understanding, molding, preserving, and changing the world that we live in.

(more…)

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Ross Melnick Wins “Book of the Year” for “American Showman” from the Theatre Historical Society of America

Ross Melnick

Congratulations to Ross Melnick author of American Showman: Samuel “Roxy” Rothafel and the Birth of the Entertainment Industry, 1908-1935 for receiving the 2013 “Book of the Year” Award from the Theatre Historical Society of America.

For more on the book: An interview with Ross Melnick; Ross Melnick on how Roxy changed the movie industry; and the birth of Radio City Music Hall

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

Design Awards for Let the Meatballs Rest and LoveKnowledge

Congratulations to our design department for being selected by jurors of Association of American University Press’s Book, Jacket, and Journal Show as the very best examples … of excellent design.”

The winners included Let the Meatballs Rest: And Other Stories About Food and Culture by Massimo Montanari; translated by Beth A. Brombert for scholarly typographic and LoveKnowledge: The Life Philosophy from Socrates to Derrida, by Roy Brand for its jacket. The book’s jacket (see below) also won an award in the 2013 New York Book Show in the category of Professional and Scholarly Books:

LoveKnowledge, Roy Brand

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Columbia University Press Books Win CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles for 2012

We were very excited to learn that several Columbia University Press titles and those of our distributed press Edinburgh were winners of the prestigious CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles for 2012.

Jonathan Lyons, Islam Through Western EyesHere’s the list and congratulations to the authors:

Sufi Bodies: Religion and Society in Medieval Islam
Shahzad Bashir

In Defense of Religious Moderation
William Egginton

Literature and Film in Cold War South Korea: Freedom’s Frontier
Theodore Hughes

Situating Existentialism: Key Texts in Context
Edited by Jonathan Judaken and Robert Bernasconi

Islam Through Western Eyes: From the Crusades to the War on Terrorism
Jonathan Lyons

Neurogastronomy: How the Brain Creates Flavor and Why It Matters
Gordon Shepherd

Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts
Haruo Shirane

When More Is Less: The International Project in Afghanistan
Astri Suhrke

A History of Namibia: From the Beginning to 1990
Marion Wallace; with John Kinahan

(more…)

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Why Civil Resistance Works wins 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order

LoveKnowledgeCongratulations to Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan, who have been awarded the 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order for their work on Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict. From the official award announcement:

“The implications of their work are enormous,” said award director Charles Ziegler. “Not only do their findings validate the work done by Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., but they shed new light on the political change we’re seeing today, such as the Arab Spring process in Egypt and other Middle Eastern nations.”

The book by Chenoweth and Stephan also won the 2012 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for best book published in the United States on government, politics or international affairs.

UofL presents four Grawemeyer Awards each year for outstanding works in music composition, world order, psychology and education. The university and Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary jointly give a fifth award in religion. This year’s awards are $100,000 each.

Again, congratulations to Professors Chenoweth and Stephan on this latest honor, and thanks to the University of Louisville and the Grawemeyer Awards judges for recognizing the hard work that went into Why Civil Resistance Works!

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Schryer wins Robert K. Martin Book Prize!

Fantasies of the New ClassCongratulations to Stephen Schryer, whose book Fantasies of the New Class: Ideologies of Professionalism in Post-World War II American Fiction has won the 2012 Robert K. Martin Book Prize!

The Robert K. Martin Book Prize is “is awarded for the best book published by a CAAS member in a calendar year,” and we are very proud that Professor Schryer’s work, along with Tess Chakkalakal’s Novel Bondage, has been recognized. The CAAS blog reports that “[prize committee members] describe Dr. Schryer’s study as ‘a rich and provocative study of the emergent aesthetics, politics, and sociology of postwar professionalism, one that leaves little doubt as to the cultural significance of the ideological formations you trace.’”

Congratulations again to Professor Schryer and to Philip Leventhal, the book’s editor!

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Award Winner! Uncreative Writing Wins the A.S.A.P. Book Prize!

Uncreative Writing, Kenneth Goldsmith

Congratulations to Kenneth Goldsmith, whose book Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age was recently awarded Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (A.S.A.P) Book Award.

Here is the announcement from A.S.A.P.

Uncreative Writing was praised by prize committee members for its clear and engaging prose, its theoretical savvy, and its unique and riveting perspective on teaching creating writing by turning to the internet and digital environments that allow students to practice and analyze the implications of techniques such as cutting and pasting, databasing, identity ciphering, and programming. Goldsmith uses sources as diverse as courtroom testimony, robo-poetics, and Twitter to teach students fundamentals of poetic form. As noted in book commentary, Goldsmith substitutes for authenticity a method of appropriation, which he says deals “a knockout blow to notions of traditional authorship.” It does not, however, deal a knockout blow to art: the results are in fact astounding, and book prize committee members noted the sophistication of the formal lessons the author was able to draw from his radical artistic practice that connects writing education to theory and praxis by Walter Benjamin, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Andy Warhol, and others. ASAP offers congratulations to Kenneth Goldsmith, winner of our 2011 Book Prize!

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Designing for Growth Named a Best Business Book

Congratulations to Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie authors of Designing for Growth: A Design Toolkit for Managers, which was named as a Best Business Book for 2011 in the management category by 800-CEO-READ.

From 800CEOREAD:

Most managers probably don’t consider themselves designers—they manage people and processes. But consider this: Instead of just thinking about who does what, how and when, what if managers began to think about how these tasks interact with customers, how the space these activities are done in (both the real space and metaphorical space) create efficiency, buy-in, job fulfillment, and profitability? By treating management as a design process, managers can create systems that have quality built in rather than simply offering rules and guidelines for employees to follow. This book is the guide to making that shift, and is an important resource for those who lead people.

For more on the book here is Tim Ogilvie discussing Designing for Growth:

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

MLA Award Winners: Donna Jones and Michael K. Bourdaghs

Donna Jones, The Racial Discourses of Life PhilosophyWe were very excited to learn that two of our authors will be receiving awards at this year’s Modern Language Association’s annual conference. And the winners are:

Donna V. Jones for her book The Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy: Négritude, Vitalism, and Modernity. From the citation for the Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies

Donna V. Jones’s Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy: Négritude, Vitalism, and Modernity is a groundbreaking study of négritude and its major theorists, the poets Léopold Senghor and Aimé Césaire, that examines their adaptation and transformation of the philosophies of vitalism proposed by Henri Bergson. Carefully tracing the tradition of Western modernity that posits the mechanical state and mechanism as its dominant forms, Jones shows how Senghor and Césaire rework “vital force” in their metaphysics and poetics and how—even as it is implicated in forms of racism and colonialism—vitalism remains an important influence on modern discourses of postcolonialism and racial emancipation. Expansive in its range and precise in its readings, the book invites a significant rethinking of important movements and philosophies of the twentieth century.

(more…)

Sunday, November 20th, 2011

Charles Egan Wins Translation Prize for Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown

Charles Egan, Clouds Thick, Whereabouts UnknownCongratulations to Charles Egan, who recently was awarded the 2011 Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize from the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) for Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown: Poems by Zen Monks of China .

The jury for the Lucien Stryk Asian Translation Prize praised Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown for “not only the high quality of its translations, which strive to keep a handsome formal ease even when observing in English the demands of syntactic parallelism, but also the considerable scholarship that Egan employs with admirable accessibility.”

(more…)

Monday, March 14th, 2011

Patrick Keating Wins Award for Hollywood Lighting from the Silent Era to Film Noir

Hollywood LightingA belated congratulations to Patrick Keating’s whose book Hollywood Lighting from the Silent Era to Film Noir was selected by the Society of Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) as the Best First Book in 2011. The award was presented to Keating this past weekend at the SCMS annual conference.

Congratulations also to Peter Decherney, author of Hollywood and the Culture Elite: How the Movies Became American, who won the service award which honors individuals who have demonstrated sustained commitment to the Society.

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Columbia University Press Outstanding Academic Titles for 2010 from Choice

Congratulations to the 10 books named as Choice Outstanding Academic Titles for 2010!

Every year, Choice subject editors single out for recognition the most significant print and electronic works reviewed in Choice during the previous calendar year. Appearing annually in Choice’s January issue, this prestigious list of publications reflects the best in scholarly titles and attracts extraordinary attention from the academic library community. The 2010 feature includes 668 titles in 54 disciplines and subsections. Here are the Columbia University Press titles that won:

Rage and Time by Peter Sloterdjik
The International Politics of Intelligence Sharing by James Igoe Walsh
Virus Alert by Stefan Elbe
Impaled Upon a Thistle by Ewen A. Cameron
Triassic Life on Land by Hans-Dieter Sues and Nicholas C. Fraser
Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth by Stephen Phillips
Everyday Ethics and Social Change by Anna L. Peterson
The Moral Fool by Hans-Georg Moeller
Pragmatism as Transition by Colin Koopman
Firestorm by Stephen Prince

To see a complete list of all our award winning titles click here.

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

Year-End Accolades for Smart Growth by Edward Hess

Smart Growth: Buidling an Enduring Business by Managing the Risks of GrowthSmart Growth: Building an Enduring Business by Managing the Risks of Growth, by Edward Hess has been receiving a variety of year-end accolades. Inc. Magazine listed it as one of the year’s best for business owners. In recommending the book, Bo Burlingham wrote:

The definitive rebuttal to the myth of “grow or die.” Professor Hess’s examples in Smart Growth come mainly from public companies, but his insights, conclusions, and advice apply equally to privately owned businesses of all shapes and sizes.

The book was also selected one of The top 10 business reads of 2010 by the Toronto Globe and Mail, which wrote:

[Hess] debunks the prevailing belief, inspired by Wall Street, that companies must grow or die. He shows how rare it is for companies to continually grow, and offers a more sensible, nuanced approach, based on a thoughtful, detailed consideration of what type of growth is best for your company.

(more…)

Monday, December 6th, 2010

Alexander C. Y. Huang wins the Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies

Chinese ShakespearesCongratulations to Alexander C. Y. Huang who recently won the Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies for his book, Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange.

The committee’s citation for Huang’s book reads:

Alexander C. Y. Huang’s Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange maps new territory for the most promising project in comparative literature today. Huang’s object is the movement of cultural forms across geographical space, but he regards such movement not as mere diffusion or even as exchange. Instead he examines the way movement across geographical and geopolitical fault lines reaches into cultural forms and changes their meanings from the inside, often revealing possibilities that had lain dormant, unnoticed, or submerged in the texts’ cultures of origin. Remarkable not only for its sophistication but also for its scholarly depth, Chinese Shakespeares is a landmark in the renewal of comparative literature as a discipline.

For more on Chinese Shakespeares, watch a video of highlights of four adaptations of “Hamlet,” “Romeo and Juliet,” and “Lear,” on screen and stage with commentary by Alexander Huang: