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Archive for March, 2017

Friday, March 31st, 2017

University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

Several university presses celebrated intriguing anniversaries this week. Duke University Press pulled together a list of essential reading from Transgender Studies Quarterly in honor of the ninth annual International Transgender Day of Visibility. The University of California Press has honored the civil and labor rights activist Cesar Chavez with a reading list of his life and times, on what would have been his 90th birthday. The University Press of Kentucky compiled a list of several of their military history titles to accompany the 84th annual meeting of the Society for Military History this weekend. And the Beacon Broadside Press looked back at their decision to edit and publish the Pentagon Papers in 1971, featuring quotes from the then-director of the Press, Gobin Stair.

Our big current affairs post of the week comes from the Oxford University Press blog, where Michael Keating, Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, unpacked the issues at stake in the Scottish National Party’s decision to go ahead with seeking a second referendum on leaving the United Kingdom, reacting to the future uncertainty of ‘Brexit’ for Scotland and the British Isles as a whole. Elsewhere, the Stanford University Press blog featured a post by Julian Berkshaw and Jonas Ridderstrale, co-authors of Fast/Forward: Make Your Company Fit for the Future (2017), on the increasing pitfalls of using big data in the business world and what they believe will be a necessary move back towards human decision making in the world of management.

The University of Pennsylvania Press blog featured a post from Columbia’s own Professor Richard John looking at the various ways in which historians have tackled the relationship between politics and the business world in the United States. And at the University of North Carolina Press blog, Jennifer Le Zotte, author of From Goodwill to Grunge: A History of Secondhand Styles and Alternative Economies (2017), contributed a fascinating guest post on the importance of thrift stores to the development of LGBTQ cultures, and how they “permanently altered the dynamics between charity, labor, activism, and profit.”

From the grab-bag of the eye-catching and the odd: at the NYU Press blog, Margaret M. McGuinness wrote on the necessity of including “trailblazing nuns” and other women religious in histories of labor and business. Temple University Press featured a piece by Lolly Tai on the importance and beauty of the best outdoor environments designed for children. At the Yale University Press blog, Timothy Bolton reflected on the biography of King Cnut, and on the challenges of writing a biography of him given that “the image of the man behind the acts as reported in the various sources of evidence often seems like the reports of the three legendary blindmen describing their elephant.” And finally: the Yale University Press continued its series ‘Bird Fact Friday’ by asking the question – why do birds sing?

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

The Historical Case for Asia Strategy

By More Than Providence

“Is the United States capable of grand strategy? Two centuries of American engagement with Asia and the Pacific strongly suggest that the answer is yes. American grand strategy has been episodic and inefficient, but in the aggregate it has been effective.” — Michael J. Green

This week, our featured book is By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783, by Michael J. Green. Today, we are happy to present an excerpt from the conclusion.

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

Introducing By More Than Providence

By More Than Providence

“Over the course of two hundred years, the United States has in fact developed a distinctive strategic approach toward Asia and the Pacific. There have been numerous instances of hypocrisy, inconsistency, and insufficient harnessing of national will and means. There have been strategic miscalculations— particularly before Pearl Harbor, on the Yalu River, and in Vietnam. In the aggregate, however, the United States has emerged as the preeminent power in the Pacific not by providence alone but through the effective (if not always efficient) application of military, diplomatic, economic, and ideational tools of national power to the problems of Asia.” — Michael J. Green

This week, our featured book is By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783, by Michael J. Green. Today, we are happy to present an excerpt from the introduction.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of By More Than Providence!

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

Michael Green on Rex Tillerson’s Beijing Visit

By More Than Providence

This week, our featured book is By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783, by Michael J. Green. In a recent appearance on NPR’s Morning Edition, Michael Green tells Steve Inskeep about what the Chinese think of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, as Tillerson meets with Chinese officials as part of a trip to Asia.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of By More Than Providence!

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

New Book Tuesday: History and Popular Memory and Race and Real Estate

History and Popular Memory

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

Now available in paperback:
History and Popular Memory: The Power of Story in Moments of Crisis
Paul A. Cohen

Now available in paperback:
Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem, 1890-1920
Kevin McGruder

Monday, March 27th, 2017

Book Giveaway! By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

By More Than Providence

“Michael Green’s magisterial study is a timely and insightful reminder of the deep and long-standing ties between East Asia and the United States, and the complex interplay between our economic and security interests, and our values, a dynamic which has shaped US policy for two and a half centuries. It is an indispensable point of reference for students and policy makers seeking to understand a critical region where history casts a long shadow, notwithstanding the extraordinary changes of recent years.” — James Steinberg, Syracuse University and former deputy secretary of state

This week, our featured book is By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783, by Michael J. Green. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

Saturday, March 25th, 2017

A Winemaker’s Skill Leads To Great Wine

The Winemaker's Hand

Natalie Berkowitz, author of The Winemaker’s Hand: Conversations on Talent, Technique, and Terroir, explains how the flavor of wine is dictated by soil and terroir, but also by the skill of the winemaker:

What makes the difference between ordinary or poor wine, sometimes called plonk, and truly great wines with complex characteristics? The current explanation dictates terroir is determined by terroir, those elements nature provides, such as soil, the amount of sun, rain, wind, and the influence of nearby rivers or oceans. The magic that comes to grapes starts when the vines derive various flavors from a soil’s characteristics. It seems counter-intuitive, but a great wine’s concentrated flavors are the consequence of grapes grown in mineral-rich soils that are often volcanic or strewn with pebbles and rocks, forcing the vine’s roots to dig deeper to find water extracting flavors from a soil’s various strata. In contrast, deep, loamy, soils produce grapes without character and flavor since the roots stay closer to the surface, reducing the opportunity to extract complex characteristics. Winemakers at large- scale wineries are less fussy about soils since they prefer optimum quantity over optimum quality while vintners with a goal of complex wines choose soils that give their vines a head-start. (more…)

Friday, March 24th, 2017

University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

Topicality has been the order of the day for many university press blogs this week. ‘Fake news’ was unpacked at the Oxford University Press blog by historian and researcher James W. Cortada, who traces the path of false information in American politics and life all the way back to 1796, and follows it through scandals to do with President Andrew Jackson, the manufacture and advertising of cigarettes, and Facebook. The Stanford University Press also addressed historical precedents for current affairs with a post by Jeffrey Dudas, recently the author of Raised Right: Fatherhood in Modern American Conservatism, tracing the paternalism of American politics from Jackson to Trump.

Other posts of current interest included one by Kevin W. Saunders at the Cambridge University Press blog, who unpacks evidence that, according to various metrics, the United States “is no longer a fully functioning democracy.” At the University of California Press blog, CUNY’s Amy Adamczyk pulled together a fascinating series of data to explore the various financial, political, and religious factors which seem to affect any given country’s public attitudes towards homosexuality. And the Johns Hopkins University Press celebrated two of its journals whose work has particular relevance to Women’s History Month.

From the grab-bag of the eye-catching and the odd: as Americans around the country shifted their clocks to Daylight Savings Time, the Harvard University Press featured an excerpt of Charles W. J. Wither’s book Zero Degrees: Geographers of the Prime Meridian (2017), which answers questions about how and why the prime meridian was set at Greenwich, in the United Kingdom, instead of anywhere else in the world. And the University of Chicago featured part of an Atlantic review of their author Simon Goldhill’s fascinating new book A Very Queer Family Indeed: Sex, Religion, and the Bensons in Victorian Britain, about a prominent family replete with intrigue and what was then considered sexual deviancy.

And in bricks-and-mortar press news, the Fordham University Press this week described their move to new offices in Manhattan. And if you’re looking for a potential internship, the University of Georgia Press and the University Press of Mississippi are both accepting applications!

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Press Roundup for ‘Weird Dinosaurs’

Weird Dinosaurs

“Our current understanding of dinosaurs is nothing like the creatures depicted in 2015′s Jurassic World... the new species are weirder than anything movie producers have been able to devise.” — John Pickrell

This week, our featured book is Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell, with a foreword by Philip Currie. Today, we feature a roundup of articles featuring Weird Dinosaurs from around the web.

The Sydney Morning Herald calls the book a “tour de force through the latest digs across the planet” that search for new species of dinosaurs, which are rapidly being discovered, and describes several such new species. For those of you who are fans of radio and podcasts, Radio New Zealand sat down with Pickerell in December and recorded a 35-minute interview with him on the book, highlighting how so many of the dinosaur species we now know have been discovered very recently – even since the 1990s.

Reviewer and dinosaur fan Jonathan Crowe admires how the book features stories of how these new dinosaurs were discovered, which are “replete with colourful characters, intrigue and controversy in some cases.” The Canadian National Post, meanwhile, has written up a list of important takeaways from Weird Dinosaurs that includes ‘rock stars’ and ‘feathered friends.’

More links and press for Weird Dinosaurs is available on its Facebook page!

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

On the Trail of Dinosaurs in Mongolia

Weird Dinosaurs

“Finds we made included the numerous remains of small herbivorous horned dinosaurs, known as Protoceratops; Velociraptor teeth; duck-billed hadrosaurs; armoured ankylosaurs and even Cretaceous-era birds’ eggs. All of these fossils hailed from the 70-million-year-old deposits of the Tugrugin Shiree region of the central Gobi Desert. Here our crew of 18 camped out in a stark, beautiful and very remote stretch of desert for 10 nights.” — John Pickrell

This week, our featured book is Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell, with a foreword by Philip Currie. Today, we follow Pickrell into the Gobi Desert as he documents the Australian Geographic Gobi Desert Fossil Dig Scientific Expedition in a video that was originally posted, along with an article by Pickrell at the Australian Geographic website. Over the course of the expedition, Mongolian paleontologists from the Institute of Paleontology and Geology in Ulaanbaatar and Australian volunteers found remains of more than thirty individual dinosaurs. Watch the 10-minute film to learn more about the dig and the dinosaur remains the team discovered!

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

How Do We Know What Dinosaurs Really Looked Like?

Weird Dinosaurs

“When faced with new fossils today, palaeontologists have a much bigger body of knowledge to draw upon when creating reconstructions. In fact, our knowledge has increased to the degree that – somewhat miraculously – we can tell the colours of the dinosaur feathers of a range of species.” — John Pickrell

This week, our featured book is Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell, with a foreword by Philip Currie. Today, we are happy to provide a short excerpt from an article written by John Pickrell for Science Focus, the online home of BBC Focus Magazine, where you can read the article in full.

How Do We Know What Dinosaurs Really Looked Like?
By John Pickrell

We take reconstructions of dinosaurs for granted these days, but just how realistic are they, and how do we know what dinosaurs really looked like?

When ancient people were faced with strange bones, they did exactly what we do today, and used the best knowledge available to reconstruct the creatures that left them behind. Sometimes this resulted in poor conclusions. The first name assigned in print to any dinosaur remains was the ignominious title of Scrotum humanum – a label given by British physician Richard Brookes to the broken end of a femur in 1763, believing it to be the fossilised testicles of a Biblical giant.

We now know that the leg bone belonged to a Megalosaurus – correctly described as an extinct reptile by William Buckland in 1824. You can’t entirely blame Brookes for his conclusions, as dinosaurs would not be described as a group until 1842. That was when Richard Owen, head of what is now the Natural History Museum, revealed to the world a new class of strange, extinct creatures he called dinosaurs, meaning ‘fearfully great reptiles’. He imagined Iguanodon, Megalosaurus and Hylaeosaurus to be reptiles with legs sprawled out to the sides, with scaly grey or green skin: something like modern lizards or crocodiles.

(more…)

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

A New Golden Age for Dinosaur Science

Weird Dinosaurs

“Dinosaurs are no longer the green or grey, dim-witted, lizard-like creatures we thought they were before the 1980s, nor the scaly, reptilian predators we remember best from Jurassic Park. Today we know they were fleet-footed and often feathery, with sharp intellects and also strange behaviours, physical attributes and adaptations.” — John Pickrell

This week, our featured book is Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell, with a foreword by Philip Currie. To get the week’s feature started, we are pleased to present an excerpt from Pickrell’s introduction.

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

New Book Tuesday: A Milestone of Chinese Experimental Literature, Weird Dinosaurs, an Ethnography of the 7 Train, and More!

Remains of Life

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

Remains of Life: A Novel
Wu He. Translated by Michael Berry.

Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew
John Pickrell. Foreword by Philip Currie.

International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train
Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum

Sociophobia: Political Change in the Digital Utopia
César Rendueles. Foreword by Roberto Simanowski. Translated by Heather Cleary.

Environmental Success Stories: Solving Major Ecological Problems and Confronting Climate Change
Frank M. Dunnivant. Afterword by Kari Norgaard.

Holy Wars and Holy Alliance: The Return of Religion to the Global Political Stage
Manlio Graziano

Theory for the Working Sociologist
Fabio Rojas (more…)

Monday, March 20th, 2017

Book Giveaway! Weird Dinosaurs, by John Pickrell

Weird Dinosaurs

“In the 26 years since Jurassic Park was released we have unearthed about 75 per cent of all known dinosaur species…. Weird Dinosaurs is a tour de force through the latest digs across the planet. It features the amazing people unearthing new fossils and highlights the odd reptiles that roamed all corners of the earth millions of years ago.” — Marcus Strom, Sydney Morning Herald

This week, our featured book is Weird Dinosaurs: The Strange New Fossils Challenging Everything We Thought We Knew, by John Pickrell, with a foreword by Philip Currie. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

A Stroke of the Pen

Chow Chop Suey

“Forty years after the Johnson-Reed Act had slammed the door on immigration from most of the world, people had generally stopped expecting further chapters to unfold in the story of immigrant cooking. Not even culinary snobs had reason to suppose that the new law [the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965] would ever affect anybody’s ideas of what to have for dinner in Minneapolis, Tallahassee, Boise, Spokane, Houston, or New York.” — Anne Mendelson

This week, our featured book is Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese American Journey, by Anne Mendelson. To start the week’s feature off, we are happy to present an excerpt from the book’s prologue.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

The History of Chinese Food in the United States

Chow Chop Suey

“Wasn’t this sudden culinary coinage simply a travesty of honest Cantonese cuisine? Well, perhaps ‘travesty,’ but not ‘simply.’ The whole story is not at all simple. We would be wrongheaded to forget that chop suey and kindred inventions like American-style chow mein or foo young took on – and possess to this day — a vigorous life of their own in American culture. For more than a century they have given millions of white (and black) diners a pleasure not to be discredited by cavils about authenticity. By my lights, they represent a permanent enrichment of the American table, first accomplished by a community under siege.” — Anne Mendelson

This week, our featured book is Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese American Journey, by Anne Mendelson. Today, we are pleased to present an article on the intertwined history of Chinese immigrants and Chinese food in the United States.

The History of Chinese Food in the United States
By Anne Mendelson

“Go back to China!” a white woman screamed at New York Times deputy Metro editor Michael Luo during the homestretch of the 2016 presidential election. The taunt is vicious even now. But at one time in this country it often presaged not hateful stares but either deportation proceedings or homicidal violence.

Chinese entering California in the 1850s with hopes of gold or at least jobs soon found demagogues accusing them of malignantly undermining honest white workingmen’s wages. One result was a series of federal laws allowing Chinese manual laborers to be deported, after a year’s hard labor, unless they could produce official certificates of residency. Another was an eruption of arson and lynchings during the 1870s and ‘80s, frequently sanctioned by local authorities.

Cantonese-born fugitives from murderous xenophobia in the Far West not only founded the Chinatowns of the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard, but managed to invent an unexpected culinary novelty that white people called by the garbled name “chop suey.” For all its ignominious modern reputation, chop suey represented a pioneering gambit in American racial politics. It turned to surprising account a hated minority’s reputation as fine cooks.

One of the few things agreed on by both hostile and friendly Westerners was that, as an English newspaper correspondent stationed in China declared in 1857, “Every Chinaman has a natural aptitude for cookery.” A phenomenal talent for cooking to please white employers had earned Chinese men a niche as household servants even in Sinophobic California. Meanwhile, they cooked for themselves with great skill whenever possible, drawing on a supply network of ingredients imported from Hong Kong to San Francisco and later New York.

Refugees from lynch mobs began settling in New York’s old Five Points district at around 1870 and promptly founded restaurants serving Cantonese cuisine, widely regarded as China’s finest. Some white New Yorkers were intrigued enough to become regular chopstick-wielders at these eateries by the late 1880s.

Within a decade, the Chinese struck gold by carefully reading the dominant race’s preferences. They improvised an ingenious marriage between Cantonese-style stir-fried dishes and some striking effects inspired by their prior experience in cooking for white people. The winning formulas depended on plenty of sugar in glossy, starch-thickened sauces liberally laced with soy sauce and browning agents. The idea was to imitate roux-bound gravy from a Western-style roast while introducing supposedly “Oriental” touches.

White patrons joyously devoured the new dishes under such names as “chicken chop suey,” “beef chop suey,” or “shrimp chop suey.” These jumbled labels reflect linguistic cross-purposes. The Chinese characters for the same items indicate “chao [stir-fried] chicken,” “chao beef,” and so forth. But the English term “stir-fry” did not yet exist. The technique was unintelligible to people who had never seen the workings of a Chinese kitchen. Encountering the romanization “chow chop suey” (“chao mixed bits”) for a dish of stir-fried innards and offal, somebody cluelessly latched onto the last two words and ended up baptizing America’s first nationwide ethnic-crossover food craze.

With unerring instinct, Chinese restaurant cooks had fashioned a cuisine that appeared exotic and adventurous to the target audience while staying safely within a middlebrow white American frame of culinary-cultural reference. The combination of very rapidly prepared food – stir-frying is the ideal short-order cooking method – with atmospheric décor featuring Chinese lanterns or dragon motifs was an instant draw.

“Chop suey” caught on from coast to coast with a speed made possible by the new miracle of wire services distributing syndicated copy from big-city newspapers to the boondocks. By 1910 it was well on its way to being the stock-in-trade of Chinese restaurants in every metropolis, small city, and large town throughout the contiguous United States.

Wasn’t this sudden culinary coinage simply a travesty of honest Cantonese cuisine? Well, perhaps “travesty,” but not “simply.” The whole story is not at all simple. We would be wrongheaded to forget that chop suey and kindred inventions like American-style chow mein or foo young took on – and possess to this day — a vigorous life of their own in American culture. For more than a century they have given millions of white (and black) diners a pleasure not to be discredited by cavils about authenticity. By my lights, they represent a permanent enrichment of the American table, first accomplished by a community under siege.

At the height of “Go back to China!” rabble-rousing cloaked in the mantle of patriotic support for jobless native-born workers, an undaunted segment of the despised Chinese community in America responded by reaching across racial divides through the medium of food. The chop suey-style cuisine that it created may be more resoundingly American than Delmonico’s, the Golden Arches, or Trump Grill.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Art in an Age of Narrowcasting — Erika Balsom

After Uniqueness, Erika Balsom

“Digital dissemination is often described in terms of freedom and ecstatic mobility. And yet it is absolutely imperative to recall that new forms of circulation have been matched by new forms of control.”—Erika Balsom

The following is a post by Erika Balsom, author of After Uniqueness: A History of Film and Video Art in Circulation:

December 19, 2016 marked the inaugural broadcast of Keimena, a weekly program of artists’ film and video on Greek public television station ERT2. Curated by Hila Peleg and Vassily Bourikas as part of the forthcoming Documenta 14, Keimena will air Mondays at midnight until September 18, 2017. Why broadcast artists’ film and video on television as part of a major international art exhibition? A look at Keimena reveals that the project engages both with the shifting distribution ecologies of contemporary moving-image art and with the specific context of Greek public television in a time and place of austerity measures.

This summer, Documenta 14 will take place not only in its usual home of Kassel, Germany, but also in Athens, where the exhibition will renew the social mandate that undergirded its founding in 1955. In Greece, Documenta’s task will be less to engage with the aftershocks of a traumatic past, as it was in postwar Kassel, than it will be to confront the ongoing contradictions and crises of a neoliberal present.

Keimena explores the notion of broadcasting as a public good and the possibilities of disseminating moving-image artworks beyond the contexts of the cinema and gallery. What unites the selection of works is an engagement with political actuality, often in a loosely documentary idiom. In the relationship between Keimena’s form and content, then, is an implicit assertion that the moving image, tied as it is to mass circulation, has a special purchase on questions of collectivity, public experience, and popular struggle.

Keimena follows in the tradition of earlier initiatives for showing artists’ film and video on television, such as The Eleventh Hour (1982–88) and Midnight Underground (1993, 1997), series shown on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom in similarly late-night time slots. Though the home is often deemed a less-than-ideal venue for cinematic spectatorship, these initiatives embrace television due to its capacity for widespread dissemination, bringing difficult-to-see works to potentially vast, diverse, and geographically dispersed audiences. Moreover, they attempt to marry this unprecedented access to enhanced possibilities of accessibility by including introductions that contextualize and enrich the viewing experience. Keimena’s broadcasts feature brief introductions by commissioned writers, texts that the curators claim “are as much as integral part of the programming effort as the films themselves.”

It might seem strange to turn to television as a means of mass dissemination in the age of the internet. Haven’t we moved from an age of broadcasting to an age of narrowcasting? In the case of Keimena, however, the recent problems of the Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT) endow the project with a specific urgency. In June 2013, the ERT’s three channels were abruptly taken off-air, putting some 2500 employees out of work and filling Greek televisions with a black screen. The government cited financial problems, calling the ERT a “haven of waste.” The closure of Greece’s national public broadcaster led to widespread protests; eventually the ERT reopened in June 2015 with the support of Alexis Tsipras’s anti-austerity Syriza party, which had formed a new government in January of that year. In collaborating with the ERT, Keimena foregrounds the role and fate of non-commercial institutions at a time when public support for the arts seems everywhere in jeopardy.

(more…)

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Introducing Chow Chop Suey

Chow Chop Suey

“It may seem unnecessary for a food historian to rehash events that have been abundantly chronicled by political and social historians. But I believe that readers of a book on Chinese American food will be well served by being asked to recognize these matters.” — Anne Mendelson

This week, our featured book is Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese American Journey, by Anne Mendelson. To start the week’s feature off, we are happy to present an excerpt from the book’s introduction.

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

New Book Tuesday: A New Novella from Yi Mun-yol, Critical Theory in Critical Times, and More!

Meeting with My Brother

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

Meeting with My Brother: A Novella
Yi Mun-yol. Translated by Heinz Insu Fenkl with Yoosup Chang.

Critical Theory in Critical Times: Transforming the Global Political and Economic Order
Edited by Penelope Deutscher and Cristina Lafont

Foucault’s Futures: A Critique of Reproductive Reason
Penelope Deutscher

Militarizing the Nation: The Army, Business, and Revolution in Egypt
Zeinab Abul-Magd

Identifying with Nationality: Europeans, Ottomans, and Egyptians in Alexandria
Will Hanley

Now available in paperback
The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Drama
Edited by J. Thomas Rimer, Mitsuya Mori, and M. Cody Poulton

Monday, March 13th, 2017

Book Giveaway! Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese American Journey

Chow Chop Suey

Chow Chop Suey is an eye-opener, a book that will give everyone a deep appreciation of the exquisite skill required to produce authentic Chinese food and the sweep of history that brought Chinese cooking to America. Anne Mendelson’s prodigious research has given us a highly respectful, insightful, refreshing, wonderfully written, and utterly compelling account of the role and plight of Chinese restaurant workers in this country. I learned something new on every page.” — Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University and author of Soda Politics

This week, our featured book is Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese American Journey, by Anne Mendelson. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.