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Archive for July, 2017

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Book Giveaway! Struggle on Their Minds: The Political Thought of African American Resistance

Struggle on Their Minds

“Fred Moten memorably wrote that the ‘history of blackness is testament to the fact that objects can and do resist.’ Alex Zamalin reaffirms this assertion through exquisite examination of narratives of resistance—not merely protest—by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, Huey Newton, and Angela Davis. Zamalin’s deft treatise demonstrates how Afro-modern political thought refashions our fundamental understandings of resistance and the attendant ideals of democracy and freedom.” — Neil Roberts, Williams College

This week, our featured book is Struggle on Their Minds: The Political Thought of African American Resistance, by Alex Zamalin. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

Friday, July 21st, 2017

University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

Let’s start with some history. The University of Michigan Press continues their series of posts commemorating the 1967 Detroit Riot; this week, Brian Matzke discusses the failures of Detroit’s public institutions. Picking up on the themes of public education and racial justice, Kay Whitlock at Beacon Broadside reminds us of the connections between school privatization and criminal justice reform. Over at NYU, Stanley I. Thangaraj urges us to “Say Her Name”—to acknowledge and celebrate the contributions of women of color to everything from professional sports to civil rights movements.

Several posts this week explore the ways in which scientific discovery and innovation intersect with social concerns. At Stanford Press, Londa Schiebinger traces flows of medical knowledge between European, Amerindian, and slave communities in the Atlantic World and identifies points of rupture. Bernd Brunner at Yale Books investigates the origins and legacy of the Apollo program, questioning whether a trip to the moon really benefitted American society and speculating on the future of space travel. Denis Alexander at Cambridge argues that science and religion have always been more closely intertwined than we tend to think, and Bonnie L. Keeler at Oxford lays out a plan for restructuring academic institutions so that future scientific innovation more directly benefits society and the planet.

Science has already given us answers to some of the most pressing questions of our time—for example, the urgent question of what wine to pair with dessert. At Yale Books, Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle provide a lively introduction to the science of taste, debunking myths about taste buds and explaining why the shape of a wineglass matters. I would recommend pairing that article with Mack McCormick’s enticing exploration of regional American stews over at Kentucky Press, or the University of Illinois Press’s brief history of the humble hot dog.

At the intersection of politics and aesthetics, Erin Greer, of Indiana University Press, examines the philosophy of conversation through the lens of Virginia Woolf. David Ebony of Yale Books criticizes the Venice Biennale, a major international art show, for lacking depth and incisiveness, though he highlights several works of art that amuse, provoke, and unsettle.

The poetic inversion of art in a sinking city might well be floating junk: Beacon Broadside interviews Marcus Eriksen, who crossed the ocean on a raft made out of garbage in order to raise awareness about plastic pollution. If, unlike Eriksen, you’re not building your own seaworthy vessels out of garbage, you probably don’t know much about the sophisticated machines you use every day—but Dennis Tenen at Stanford argues that you should have the right to tinker with, interpret, and understand your technology.

From the grab-bag of the eye-catching and the odd: To celebrate the return of Game of Thrones this week, Greg Garrett at Oxford asks what the abundance of zombie apocalypses on TV reveals about modern society. For more family-friendly entertainment, Travis D. Stimeling says, go enjoy a local bluegrass festival and learn about this uniquely American music genre.

Have a great week.

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

Designed Leadership: A Case Study

Designed Leadership

“C3 presented an opportunity to demonstrate that, in Vancouver, things can be done differently. We can break down the disciplinary isolation in our institutions. We can collaborate more effectively while providing a real-world learning environment for students.” — Moura Quayle

This week, our featured book is Designed Leadership, by Moura Quayle. Today, we are happy to start the feature off with an excerpt from the book’s case studies section, in which Quayle uses her real world experience working with Vancouver’s Campus City Collaborative (C3) to meet the city’s challenging “greenest city” goals.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of Designed Leadership!

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

Introduction to the Principles of Designed Leadership

Designed Leadership

“Designed leadership depends on having some sort of problem-solving or opportunity-seeking process to help you when you need to plan or when you are ‘stuck.’ Even when you may not be quite sure of where you are going, having a thinking process is essential. It is a touchstone along the journey.” — Moura Quayle

This week, our featured book is Designed Leadership, by Moura Quayle. Today, Quayle provides an introduction to the principles of designed leadership she discusses at greater length in her book.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of Designed Leadership!

Introduction to the Principles of Designed Leadership
By Moura Quayle

Looking at familiar places, I realized that the last time I had worked in our capital city was in the private sector, as the principal of a built environment design business – it would now be called a “start-up.” Close to four decades later, looking out my government office window when tasked with reviewing and updating a system of twenty five institutions with assets in around fifty locations and links in a hundred countries, serving over one hundred eighty thousand students, and governed by twenty five boards with combined operating budgets of $1.6 billion, I wondered what in the world prepared me for this task. The products I was dealing with were ideas and people, with no common bricks and mortar, or other tangible form. My task was providing leadership for organizational and institutional transformation.

Yet I felt comfortable and confident in using a strategic design approach. Over the previous quarter century I had studied and applied it, scaled up and out. More importantly, perhaps, I had learned the importance of the old saw that to go far you need to go with others. When applying risk management and fiscal accountability in integrating diverse interests, this meant building common understanding of terms of reference and decision-making values as well as information infrastructure. When the context is complex and dynamic for the long-term, the skills are not intuitive but learned. Designed leadership. (more…)

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

Strategic Design in Action

Designed Leadership

“This book is about how we can lead better. As we remember the joys and potential of lifelong learning, it is also worth remembering that the leaders among us, from every sector, all once faced the world as fresh-faced, wide-eyed, and innocent preschoolers…. The principles here will connect the surviving naïfs in us all to the disciplined future leaders that we all have the capacity to become.” — Moura Quayle

This week, our featured book is Designed Leadership, by Moura Quayle. Today, we are happy to start the feature off with an excerpt from the book’s introduction, in which Quayle discusses the need for theories of effective leadership, what design principles and practices actually are, and the value of integrating design and leadership.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of Designed Leadership!

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

New Book Tuesday: The New Age of Reproductive Biology, the Impossibility and Necessity of Classifying Psychiatric Disorders, and More!

Fear, Wonder, and Science in the New Age of Reproductive Biotechnology

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

Fear, Wonder, and Science in the New Age of Reproductive Biotechnology
Scott Gilbert and Clara Pinto-Correia. Foreword by Donna Haraway.

The Diagnostic System: Why the Classification of Psychiatric Disorders Is Necessary, Difficult, and Never Settled
Jason Schnittker

The Demand for Health: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation
Michael Grossman

Children Affected by Armed Conflict: Theory, Method, and Practice
Edited by Myriam Denov and Bree Akesson

Now available in paperback:
Investment: A History
Norton Reamer and Jesse Downing

Monday, July 17th, 2017

Book Giveaway! Designed Leadership

Designed Leadership

“This book contributes a very thoughtful set of observations about the principles and practices of successful leaders who rely on a ‘strategic design’ approach. Moura Quayle draws on a diverse and impressive range of personal leadership experiences to illustrate and emphasize her points. Insightful, yet still accessible.” — Jeanne Liedtka, University of Virginia Darden School of Business

This week, our featured book is Designed Leadership, by Moura Quayle. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

Friday, July 14th, 2017

University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

A number of university press blogs this week discussed race in America across the centuries. The University of Washington Press shares an excerpt from Coll Thrush’s book Native Seattle, which looks at the historical and present-day survivance—survival/resistance—of Indigenous communities in Seattle. Over at Harvard Press, Katherine Benton-Cohen reflects on the centennial of the “Bisbee Deportation,” an illegal mass deportation of over a thousand striking mineworkers in Arizona, while Glenda M. Flores at the NYU Press blog talks about the efforts of Latina teachers in L.A. to protect children with undocumented parents. At the University of Michigan Press, Brian Matzke kicks off a series of posts on the context and legacy of the 1967 Detroit riot. Finally, Duke University Press gives us a reading list of articles on racial justice as part of its Read and Respond Series. (more…)

Friday, July 14th, 2017

Introducing The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

“We argue … that violent radicalization is a social process involving behavior that can be observed, comprehended, and modeled in a clearly understandable diagram. Thus, insofar as the behavioral patterns can be detected by family members, friends, and other associates, a lone wolf attack may be preventable. In this book we provide evidence that lone wolf attacks have, in fact, been stopped by the interventions of family members and ordinary citizens.” — Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij

This week, our featured book is The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism, by Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij, with a foreword by Simon Cottee. For the final day of the week’s feature, we are happy to present the authors’ introduction to their book, in which they lay out what they refer to as “lone wolf terrorism,” why the topic is so important, and what they hope their project will accomplish.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of the book!

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

The (Updated) Curious Legacy of James Comey

The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

“Because the FBI’s sting program concentrates its resources primarily in Muslim-American communities, critics charge that the FBI has eroded community trust in those areas, instigated fear, and silenced dissent necessary for participatory democracy. Moreover, say the critics, the United States is manufacturing terrorism by entrapping innocent Muslims.” — Mark Hamm and Ramón Spaaij

This week, our featured book is The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism, by Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij, with a foreword by Simon Cottee. Today’s article originally appeared on the Columbia University Press blog in June, but we are happy to repost it with some revisions made based on recent events.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of the book!

The Curious Legacy of James Comey
Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij

Say what you will about James Comey—to his supporters the fired FBI Director is a bona fide American hero while President Trump has derided him as a “showboat” and a “nut job”—but of this we can be sure: Comey’s revelations about Donald Trump’s possible attempt to obstruct justice in the investigation of Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections has deflected public attention away from Comey’s performance as the nation’s top law enforcement official in the fight against domestic terrorism. He has much to answer for. The United States experienced more than two dozen terrorist attacks on Comey’s watch (September 2013-May 2017), including the ISIS-inspired mass shootings in San Bernardino and Orlando, along with shooting rampages by homegrown jihadists and anti-government extremists in Kansas, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Louisiana, Colorado, and Oregon. In all, more than two-hundred were killed or wounded in these attacks, including a number of police officers. The most lethal attacks were perpetrated by atomized “lone wolf” terrorists.

A major approach to preventing lone wolf terrorism in the United States is an aggressive FBI sting program designed to catch terrorists before they strike. Inaugurated by the Bush administration after 9/11, the FBI’s sting program became the nation’s leading preemptive counter-terrorism strategy during Comey’s tenure as director. In February 2015, at the peak of his influence, Comey announced that the bureau had investigations into “homegrown violent extremism” in all fifty states. Most were sting operations against suspects with an affinity for al-Qaeda and ISIS. (more…)

Wednesday, July 12th, 2017

Simon Cottee on The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

“The enduring merit of The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism is that it provides an empirically robust and theoretically nuanced framework for addressing how ordinary individuals can become the agents of extraordinary violence and destruction.” — Simon Cottee

This week, our featured book is The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism, by Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij, with a foreword by Simon Cottee. Today, we are happy to present an excerpt from Cottee’s foreword, in which he explains how Hamm and Spaaij firmly ground their work in extensive empirical research on actual terrorists, lists some of the important things that their research shows, and argues that they show that “however tangled and complex the lives of lone actor terrorists are, there are commonalities of experience cross scores of cases.”

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy of the book!

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

New Book Tuesday: The Mathematics of Inequality, the Development of Life Insurance, and More!

How Much Inequality Is Fair?

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

How Much Inequality Is Fair?: Mathematical Principles of a Moral, Optimal, and Stable Capitalist Society
Venkat Venkatasubramanian

Morals and Markets: The Development of Life Insurance in the United States
Viviana A. Rotman Zelizer. Foreword by Kieran Healy.

Now available in paperback:
Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature
Rebecca L. Walkowitz

Now available in paperback:
Marx After Marx: History and Time in the Expansion of Capitalism
Harry Harootunian

Fiber City: A Vision for the Shrinking Megacity, Tokyo 2050 [Bilingual: Japanese/English]
Hidetoshi Ohno
(University of Tokyo Press)

Studying Waltz with Bashir
Giulia Miller
(Auteur)

Monday, July 10th, 2017

Book Giveaway! The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism

“Covering characters as diverse as James Earl Ray, Sirhan Sirhan, Mark Essex, Lynnette “Squeaky” Fromme, Ted Kaczynski, Eric Rudolph, Jared Loughner, Wade Page, and Christopher Dorner, Hamm and Spaaij have written an excellent and well-researched survey of lone wolf terrorists in the United States—and a major addition to the field.” — Charles B. Strozier, founding director, Center on Terrorism at John Jay College of Criminal Justice

This week, our featured book is The Age of Lone Wolf Terrorism, by Mark S. Hamm and Ramón Spaaij, with a foreword by Simon Cottee. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017

New Book Tuesday: Poetry and Punk Rock in NYC, a History of Consumer Surveillance in the US, and More!

Our weekly listing of new books now available:

“Do You Have a Band?”: Poetry and Punk Rock in New York City
Daniel Kane

Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and Financial Identity in America
Josh Lauer

The Origins of Neoliberalism: Modeling the Economy from Jesus to Foucault
Dotan Leshem

Wright’s Writings: Reflections on Culture and Politics, 1894–1959
Kenneth Frampton
(Columbia Books on Architecture and the City)

The Cinema of Wes Anderson: Bringing Nostalgia to Life
Whitney Crothers Dilley
(Wallflower Press)

The Holy Mountain
Alessandra Santos
(Wallflower Press)