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March 30th, 2015

Book Giveaway! Intimate Rivals, by Sheila A. Smith



Intimate Rivals

“This book by one of America’s leading analysts of Japan’s foreign relations is essential reading for anyone interested in Sino-Japanese relations and the impact of domestic political forces on foreign policy.” — Thomas J. Christensen

This week our featured book is Intimate Rivals: Japanese Domestic Politics and a Rising China, by Sheila A. Smith. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

We are also offering a FREE copy of Intimate Rivals. To enter our book giveaway, simply fill out the form below with your name and preferred mailing address. We will randomly select our winners on Friday, April 3rd at 1:00 pm. Good luck, and spread the word!

March 29th, 2015

Academic Freedom and Literature – Author Events This Week



Who's Afraid of Academic Freedom?

For those of you planning your weekly agenda, here are a few events we’re looking forward to:

Akeel Bilgrami and Jonathan Cole, the editors of Who’s Afraid of Academic Freedom?, discuss their book at a launch event at Book Culture in NYC on Tuesday, March 31st at 7:00 PM.

Dalkey Archive Press authors Louis Bury, Exercises in Criticism, and Bruce Bromley, Making Figures, consider the ways in which criticism is itself an act of artistic making in an event at The Humanities Initiative at NYU on Tuesday, March 31st at 6:00 PM.

Dorothy Tse, one of Hong Kong’s most acclaimed young writers, reads from her short story collection Snow and Shadow at evening events with the Asian American Writers’ Workshop on Thursday, April 2nd and the China Institute on Friday, April 3rd.

The editors of A Coney Island Reader present a gallery of portraits of the legendary Brooklyn neighborhood from some of the world’s finest poets, essayists, and fiction writers at a lunch hour event at the 92Y.

To find out more about these and other upcoming events check out our Author Events Calendar.

March 27th, 2015

University Press Roundup



University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

This week the University of California Press Blog continued their Behind the Scenes post series with a look at the challenges that Susan Sered faced in writing Can’t Catch a Break, her in-depth study of “how marginalized women navigate an unforgiving world.” The post explains the methodology that Sered and coauthor Maureen Norton-Hawk followed in conducting their long-term study, and delves into the ways that Sered and Norton-Hawk were able to maintain contact and build trust with the marginalized and traumatized women with whom they worked.

At fifteeneightyfour, the blog of Cambridge University Press, abortion politics get a close look in two separate posts. First, Douglas Walton and Fabrizio Macagno finish their series on Emotive Language in Argumentation with an examination of how “carefully constructed argumentative language influences the debate over abortion.” Then, Deana A. Rohlinger looks at political and social trends and concludes that, while the public debate over abortion is certainly different now than it was in the early 2010s, it certainly hasn’t gone away. Read the rest of this entry »

March 26th, 2015

Kimerer LaMothe on Why We Dance



Why We Dance

The following is an interview with Kimerer LaMothe, author of Why We Dance: A Philosophy of Bodily Becoming:

Why did you write this book?

Kimerer LaMothe: I love to dance, every day. It is vital for my wellbeing. And when I scan the landscape of human life, I see dance everywhere—in the earliest human art, the oldest forms of culture, and in every culture around the world into the present. Yet in the maps of and for human life that comprise the philosophy, theology, and religious studies of the modern west, dance occupies a surprisingly small space. Rarely do authors consider dancing as vital to human life, especially to a human’s religious life. I wanted to change that.

How did you decide to approach this problem?

KLL: Before beginning this book, I spent years delving into written works of the western canon, trying to identify the intellectual moves that make it nearly impossible for a given philosopher or theologian to affirm dance as a medium of religious experience and expression. I looked for exceptions. I looked for thinkers who were willing to consider dance as more than just a metaphor, or more than just a crude alternative to the “finer” arts or “higher,” more cerebral forms of religion.

The problem went deeper than I thought. The bias against dance in the western tradition is not simply evidence of a mind/body problem, a fear of sexuality, or a patriarchal devaluing of the feminine per se. Rather, the challenge for dance is rooted in the fact that that the tradition’s dominant structures and patterns of thinking express and reinforce the lived experience of people who have spent years training themselves to read and write. Much of western thought is an apology for the life of a book-bound mind.

While this trajectory of cultural development has enabled tremendous advances in numerous realms, it is less helpful when it comes to making sense of why humans always have and continue to dance.

In order to show how dance is vital to our humanity, I realized that I would have to retell the story of what it means to be a human being from the lived experience of dancing. I would have to tell a story in which bodily movement appears as the source and telos of human life.

Fortunately, across disciplines, researchers and scientists are discovering what many dancers have known and practiced for years: that bodily movement is essential to the biological, emotional, spiritual, and ecological development of human persons. Thus, when I set out to write this book, I had a lot of material on which to draw in making my case.

Read the rest of this entry »

March 26th, 2015

Two Early Chicago Films Heading to Blu-Ray



The following post is by Michael Smith, co-author with Adam Selzer of Flickering Empire: How Chicago Invented the U.S. Film Industry

In the introduction to Flickering Empire, Adam Selzer and I quote film scholar Susan Doll who said that it is Chicago’s “best kept secret” that it served as the nation’s filmmaking capital prior to the rise of Hollywood. That the vast majority of the films made in Chicago prior to 1920 have been either lost, destroyed or are otherwise difficult to see partly accounts for Chicago’s neglected status in the official film histories. Fortunately, the two most important Chicago-made silent films discussed in our book have both been recently restored and will receive re-releases on home video in HD in the next year. These releases will hopefully go some way towards giving Chicago the credit it deserves for the important role it played in our nation’s film history. The two films in question are:

His New Job—The one and only film Charlie Chaplin made in Chicago is this delightful 20-minute comedy short, the first he made for Essanay Studios (before fulfilling the rest of his contract at the company’s California branch). The plot sees Chaplin’s familiar “Little Tramp” character showing up to audition for a part in a movie at “Lodestone Studios.” The interior stages at Essanay in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood essentially play themselves as Lodestone and the movie thus becomes a fascinating peak into the process of silent moviemaking, at times achieving a near-documentary quality. The Tramp gets a job first as Production Assistant, then as a carpenter and finally as an extra in what appears to be a prestigious “period” film set in 19th century Russia. Of course, he wreaks havoc on the set and the entire production soon devolves into a state of slapstick anarchy. His New Job will be released on Blu-ray by Flicker Alley in Summer 2015. In the meantime, you can watch an unrestored version of the film here:

Within Our Gates—The earliest surviving feature film directed by an African American is this incendiary drama by the legendary Oscar Micheaux. Evelyn Preer plays Sylvia Landry, a young black woman from Chicago who tries to raise money to save a school for black children in the rural south. Micheaux’s story alternates between scenes taking place in the north and south as well as the past and the present in order to generate a suspenseful climax — a lengthy flashback to the events that led to Sylvia’s adoptive parents being lynched by an angry mob. This lynching scene is intercut with an equally horrifying scene where a villainous middle-aged white man attempts to rape the young Sylvia before recognizing a scar on her chest that identifies her as his own illegitimate daughter. The clever intercutting of this climax intentionally unpacks the racist ideology of the climax of D.W. Griffith’s similarly constructed The Birth of a Nation. Within Our Gates will be released on Blu-ray by Kino/Lorber in February 2016. In the meantime, you can watch an unrestored version of the film here:

March 25th, 2015

Sandra Fahy on North Korea and the Impact of Famine



Sandra Fahy, Marching Through Suffering

“This fact, that they use humor and wordplay, directly challenges the notion that [North Koreans] are all brainwashed victims.”—Sandra Fahy

Earlier this Fall, North Korea News interviewed Sandra Fahy about her book Marching Through Suffering: Loss and Survival in North Korea, which we just published. It’s a fascinating interview in which Fahy describes some of the challenges of studying North Korea, particularly given her background in anthropology. Obviously not able to talk to people living in North Korea, Fahy spoke with recent defectors to learn about how North Koreans make sense of their world.

Fahy points out that the famine in North Korea has not produced the kind of social upheaval some policymakers thought might happen. She argues that famine rarely does cause these kinds of monumental change, however, she was surprised by the lack of anger on the part of North Koreans:

When I was conducting the research I was surprised by something: I had expected North Koreans would have been angry, annoyed, judging of the state for failing to provide food for them (as it promised to do).

They were angry after the fact, in South Korea and China, but when I asked them to recollect their lives in North Korea they did not have anger toward the state then. They did not see the triage of resources toward the military, toward the capital, as unfair. Rather “that’s just the way it was”—this kind of banal rationalization that was unusual to me.

I believe my most important findings are these: first of all, we should not presume that those who defect are always and necessarily the worst off. Many still hold the memory of Kim Il Sung highly, while demonizing Kim Jong Il.

Read the rest of this entry »

March 25th, 2015

Interview with Michael Glover Smith, Co-Author of “Flickering Empire (Part 2)



Flickering Empire, Michael Glover Smith and Adam Selzer

The following is the second part of our interview with Michael Glover Smith, co-author of Flickering Empire: How Chicago Invented the U.S. Film Industry. (You can read part 1 here.)

Question: Oscar Micheaux also was part of Chicago’s film history. In what ways was Chicago important for the development of African-American or “race” movies?

Michael Glover Smith: A lot of the early films dealing with race offer “comical” racial stereotypes that are offensive. Even the first Essanay film, An Awful Skate, features a white actor in blackface makeup. William Foster, an enterprising African-American theater manager, founded the first black-owned film production company in 1910. Foster has been quoted as saying, “Nothing has been done so much to awaken race consciousness of the colored man in the nation as the motion picture. It has made him hungry to see himself.” In addition to the earliest shorts by the Foster Photoplay Company, Chicago was home to many other early “race films,” including Peter P. Jones’s The Slacker in 1917 and Oscar Micheaux’s Within Our Gates in 1919. The latter, which we discuss at length in our book’s post-script, is the earliest surviving feature film directed by an African American. It’s not only a great film, it’s a rare and invaluable document of black American culture from that era.

Q: As you mention in the book, Chicago played a role in the censorship of films. What was the legacy of Major M.L.C. Funkhouser in determining what Americans saw at the movies?

MGS: Learning about the role of Chicago’s censorship board in doing research for the book was really eye-opening. The local censorship board, under the auspices of Funkhouser, was actually stricter than the national censorship board. There are a lot of fascinating and funny stories about the board and so that ended up becoming an entire chapter in our book. Funkhouser was reactionary in harshly censoring sex, violence and political content deemed inflammatory but he was also a politically corrupt hypocrite who would throw parties and screen the naughty bits that he had ordered cut from the films. He also allowed the Chicago Tribune to print descriptions of scenes that had been censored, which resulted in him getting favorable publicity from that particular paper. He was quite a character.

Q: So, what happened? What explains the decline of the Chicago film industry?

MGS: There were a complex combination of factors that resulted in the decline of Chicago’s film empire. But, basically, it can be reduced to: 1) the two major Chicago studios were part of the Motion Picture Patents Corporation (or MPPC), a trust that Edison had established in an attempt to monopolize the industry; this trust was sued and forced to disband by the U.S. Justice Department in 1913, 2) most of the independent (i.e., non-MPPC) filmmakers had fled to southern California in order to make movies as far away from Edison and his patent-enforcing “Goon Squad” as possible and 3) the weather and geography of southern California were ultimately deemed more conducive to year-round shooting than Chicago.

Read the rest of this entry »

March 24th, 2015

New Book Tuesday: Junk DNA, Michael Jackson’s Harmattan, The End of Cinema, and More!



Junk DNA, Nessa Carey

Our weekly listing of new titles:

Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome
Nessa Carey

Harmattan: A Philosophical Fiction
Michael Jackson

The End of Cinema?: A Medium in Crisis in the Digital Age
André Gaudreault and Philippe Marion. Translated by Timothy Barnard

Marching Through Suffering: Loss and Survival in North Korea
Sandra Fahy

Terrorism in Cyberspace: The Next Generation
Gabriel Weimann. Foreword by Bruce Hoffman

The Cinema of George A. Romero: Knight of the Living Dead
Tony Williams

Empires of Panic: Epidemics and Colonial Anxieties
Edited by Robert Peckham

Picturing Technology in China: From Earliest Times to the Nineteenth Century
Peter J. Golas

Ukraine’s Euromaidan: Analyses of a Civil Revolution
Edited by David R. Marples and Frederick V. Mills

Memory is Our Home: Loss and Remembering: Three Generations in Poland and Russia 1917-1960s
Suzanna Eibuszyc

March 24th, 2015

Interview with Michael Smith, co-author of “Flickering Empire”



Interview with Michael Smith, co-author of

“A lot of innovations came out of Chicago. There were a lot of ‘famous firsts’ for the American film industry and for movies as an art form—including the first pseudo-documentaries, the first two-reeler, the first slapstick comedy to feature a ‘pie-in-the-face-gag….’”—Michael Glover Smith

The following is part 1 of our interview with Michael Glover Smith, co-author of Flickering Empire: How Chicago Invented the U.S. Film Industry:

Question: Why does Chicago get left out of the history of early cinema in America?

Michael Glover Smith: The story of American film production begins in New York and New Jersey (where Thomas Edison was headquartered) in the late 19th century. Hollywood didn’t really become the nation’s film-producing capital until about 1915. All official histories are somewhat reductive and I think it’s been convenient for scholars and historians to just skip over the story of Chicago’s contributions to film history, which mainly occurred in in the late 1900s and early 1910s. Even though the contributions of Chicago filmmakers were enormous by any objective standard, it was a fairly narrow window of time when the film industry in Chicago was at its peak and, also, the vast majority of Chicago-made films of that era no longer exist. They’ve been destroyed or lost and it’s never been fashionable to write about films that people can’t see.

Q: How does Chicago’s role in the development change the way we think about the history of movies in America?

MGS: I think a lot of innovations came out of Chicago. There were a lot of “famous firsts” for the American film industry and for movies as an art form—including the first pseudo-documentaries, the first two-reeler, the first slapstick comedy to feature a “pie-in-the-face-gag,” the first films made by African-American directors, etc. We give a rundown in the introduction to the book. It’s entirely possible that movies as we now know them would look very different if not for the contributions of studios like Essanay and Selig-Polyscope and also the independent filmmakers (especially the aforementioned black directors).

Q: What was the role of the 1893 Columbia Exhibit in popularizing film in Chicago and the rest of the country?

MGS: The World’s Fair of 1893 had an enormous influence on the developing film industry. There were several important prototypical movie-exhibition devices that premiered there—including Eadweard Muybridge’s Zoopraxiscope and Otto Anschutz’s Tachyscope. A lot of the early Chicago filmmakers went to the Fair and were inspired to start making films based on what they saw.

Read the rest of this entry »

March 23rd, 2015

Injustice at Home, New Opportunities Abroad — Author Events this Week



The Greening of Asia, Mark L. Clifford

We’re very excited about this week’s participation of Columbia University Press in two special events that engage with some of the most pressing social, economic, and environmental issues of our time:

First off is tonight’s conversation between James Liebman, author of The Wrong Carlos: An Anatomy of a Wrongful Execution, and Robert Ferguson, George Edward Woodberry Professor in Law, Literature, and Criticism. The two will discuss The Wrong Carlos at the Columbia Law School at 6:30.

Meanwhile, later this week on March 25th and halfway across the world, Mark L. Clifford will discuss his new book The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia’s Environmental Emergency, new from Columbia Business School Publishing. The event is part of the The Bookworm Literary Festival in Beijing and will be moderated by Stuart Leavenworth, Beijing Bureau Chief of McClatchy Newspapers.

March 23rd, 2015

Book Giveaway! “Flickering Empire”



This week our featured book is Flickering Empire: How Chicago Invented the U.S. Film Industry by Michael Glover Smith and Adam Selzer.

In addition to featuring the book and the author on the blog, we will also be posting about the book on twitter, and facebook.

We are also offering a FREE copy of Flickering Empire to one winner. To enter the contest please e-mail pl2164@columbia.edu and include your name and address. The winner will be selected Friday, March 27th at 1:00 pm.

Flickering Empire tells the fascinating yet little-known story of how Chicago served as the unlikely capital of American film production in the years before the rise of Hollywood (1907-1913). Flickering Empire illustrates the rise and fall of the major Chicago movie studios in the mid-silent era (principally Essanay and Selig Polyscope). Colorful, larger-than-life historical figures, including Thomas Edison, Charlie Chaplin, Oscar Micheaux, and Orson Welles, are major players in the narrative—in addition to important though forgotten industry titans, such as “Colonel” William Selig, George Spoor, and Gilbert “Broncho Billy” Anderson.

March 20th, 2015

University Press Roundup



University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

March Madness is already in full swing, and while it may be too late to submit your bracket for this year’s tournament, a post on using math in making bracket picks by Liana Valentino on the Princeton University Press Blog is great tournament reading regardless.

Speaking of March Madness, at From the Square, the blog of NYU Press, Stanley I. Thangaraj contemplates what the NCAA Tournament, our tendency to celebrate both athletes and coaches, and the structure of the NCAA as an organization tell us about American society in general.

Tuesday, March 17, was, of course, St. Patrick’s Day. At the UNC Press Blog, Cian T. McMahon discusses the phenomenon of Irish transnationalism and how St. Patrick’s Day is observed around the world. Read the rest of this entry »

March 20th, 2015

A Genealogy of Morgan Stanley



Genealogy of American Finance

This week our featured book is Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla, with a foreword from Charles M. Royce. Today, for the final day of the feature, we’ve excerpted a sample chapter focused on one of the Big 50: Morgan Stanley.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy!

March 19th, 2015

Charles Royce’s Foreword to Genealogy of American Finance



Genealogy of American Finance

This week our featured book is Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla. Today, we are happy to present Charles M. Royce’s foreword to Wright and Sylla’s book, in which Royce focuses on the importance of the Museum of American Finance both in the process of creating the Genealogy and in a broader cultural context.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy!

Foreword
By Charles M. Royce, CEO, The Royce Funds

I was introduced to the leadership of the Museum of American Finance through my friend and television personality, Consuelo Mack, who serves on the Museum’s Board of Trustees. During the course of my initial conversation with President David Cowen, I brought up an idea I have had for years, which is to trace the genealogies — or family trees — of the major American financial firms. I have been working in finance for more than 50 years and have witnessed first-hand many dramatic changes in the industry. So many firms that existed when I first began investing are no longer around.

Given that my firm looks for “value” in companies when we invest, I asked David if there was value in this idea. His response was that, indeed, this would be an invaluable research tool. This book is the first output of that discussion.

As the only independent finance museum in the nation, the Museum often fields calls from researchers inquiring about what happened to certain firms or banks — now defunct or acquired. Many times those questions have been difficult to answer. Moreover, the two main regulatory bodies, The Federal Reserve and the FDIC, do not have complete information and are, therefore, also unable to also answer those questions. According to the Museum’s exhibit team, an area of the “Banking in America” exhibit featuring an abridged genealogy of the Bank of America was the single largest piece of research that went into any section of the Museum’s permanent exhibits. This is largely because more than one hundred years’ worth of merger and acquisition data is so difficult to come by.

My conversations with David and the Museum team resulted in my commitment to underwrite a massive research project to compile these family trees and house them in a central location. It has taken well over a year of research — which included hundreds of hours of archival legwork — to compile these genealogies and make them publicly available.

I applaud Professors Wright and Sylla for their research and writing efforts, which have made this project a reality. As a Columbia University MBA, I am pleased to note that my alma mater has enthusiastically embraced this idea as well, and that this beautiful book has been produced by Columbia Business School Publishing.

Now, if the Museum receives a research inquiry about past financial firms, the staff is able to answer where that firm’s history fits into the modern financial landscape. Or, better yet, people can access the information themselves via this book or the Museum’s website.

This project sheds tremendous light into the dynamic nature of our nation’s financial history. One can never completely understand the future without a comprehension of the past. In an easy-to-read and understandable manner, this book gives a narrative history that is accessible to all — from the newcomer working at a bank to the finance professional, from the student to the scholar, from the practitioner to the regulator.

Please enjoy the book, as each chapter will transport you back in time to see the birth and growth of these 50 financial institutions.

March 18th, 2015

An Overview of the Big 50 Banks



Genealogy of American Finance

This week our featured book is Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla, with a foreword from Charles M. Royce. Today, we’ve excerpted “Overview of the Big 50,” a set of infographics provided by Wright and Sylla that give context for their discussion of the Big 50 Banks.

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy!

March 17th, 2015

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!



Columbia University Press wishes you a very happy St. Patrick’s Day from New York! For St. Paddy’s, take a look at a few of the many impressive titles from Dalkey Archive’s Irish Literature Series.

The Dalkey Archive
Flann O’Brien

Hailed as “the best comic fantasy since Tristram Shandy” upon its publication in 1964, The Dalkey Archive is Flann O’Brien’s fifth and final novel.

From Out of the City
John Kelly

From Out of the City is intricate, outrageous, sophisticated, funny and wonderfully entertaining: what more could a reader ask?”
— John Banville

The Cold Eye of Heaven
Christine Dwyer Hickey

“Christine Dwyer Hickey’s tale of a very ordinary Dubliner, starting at the close of his life, is the most profound novel I have read for years.”
The Guardian

The Key (Dual-Language Edition)
Máirtin Ó Cadhain
Translated by Louis de Paor and Lochlainn Ó Tuairisg

“He is one of the most important writers of the twentieth century.”
BBC

March 17th, 2015

A Brief History of Banking in the United States



Genealogy of American Finance

“To fully comprehend the history or genealogy of any bank or BHC, a general knowledge of US banking and business organizational history is required.” — Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla

This week our featured book is Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla, with a foreword from Charles M. Royce. Today, we are happy to present an excerpt from the book’s introduction, “A Brief History of Banking in the United States.”

Don’t forget to enter our book giveaway for a chance to win a free copy!

March 17th, 2015

New Book Tuesday: The Greening of Asia, Manchu Princess Turned Japanese Spy, and More New Books



The Greening of Asia

The following books are now available:

The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia’s Environmental Emergency
Mark L. Clifford

Manchu Princess, Japanese Spy: The Story of Kawashima Yoshiko, the Cross-Dressing Spy Who Commanded Her Own Army
Phyllis Birnbaum

Why We Dance: A Philosophy of Bodily Becoming
Kimerer L. LaMothe

Nietzsche Versus Paul
Abed Azzam

Behind the Station: A Novel
Arno Camenisch. Translated by Donal McLaughlin

Diglossia and the Linguistic Turn: Flann O’Brien’s Philosophy of Language
Flore Coulouma

March 16th, 2015

Book Giveaway! Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla



Genealogy of American Finance

Genealogy of American Finance is a treasure trove of information on American banking and its history, in an unusual — and unusually useful — format.” — John Steele Gordon

This week our featured book is Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla, with a foreword from Charles M. Royce. Throughout the week, we will be featuring content about the book and its author on our blog as well as on our Twitter feed and our Facebook page.

We are also offering a FREE copy of Genealogy of American Finance. To enter our book giveaway, simply fill out the form below with your name and preferred mailing address. We will randomly select our winners on Friday, March 20th at 1:00 pm. Good luck, and spread the word!

March 13th, 2015

University Press Roundup



University Press Roundup

Welcome to our weekly roundup of the best articles from the blogs of academic publishers! As always, if you particularly enjoy something or think that we missed an important post, please let us know in the comments. (And look back at our University Press Roundup Manifesto to see why we do this post every Friday.)

Harper Lee’s forthcoming second novel has generated excitement and controversy in equal measure, but at Beacon Broadside, Kay Whitlock and Michael Bronski look back at Lee’s famous first novel. In particular, they are interested in the way that To Kill a Mockingbird speaks to the current racial tensions and structural problems that pervade the United States today.

How are emotions used in argumentation? At fifteeneightyfour, Douglas Walton and Fabrizio Macagno are beginning a series of posts in which they discuss the differences between rhetorical argumentation and logical argumentation and how we use emotive language in order to win debates.

March 7th is fiftieth anniversary of Bloody Sunday, “the day Civil Rights marchers were beaten by police as they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama” (as portrayed in the recent film Selma). Duke University Press has shared an excerpt from Gary May’s Bending Toward Justice, in which May explains how Americans found out about the events of Bloody Sunday, in honor of the occasion. Read the rest of this entry »