Eric Walrond, Harlem Renaissance Forgotten Giant — James Davis

Eric Walrond

In celebration of Black History Month, we continue our focus on recent titles in African-American studies. Today, we look at Eric Walrond: A Life in the Harlem Renaissance and the Transatlantic Caribbean, by James Davis, which was recently featured in the Daily News.

In the article, Davis explains Walrond’s important role in the Harlem Renaissance, who was friends with such figures as Countee Cullen and Langston Hughes. Walrond was best-known for Tropic of Death, his book of short stories, which offered one of the first portrayals of Caribbean characters in American literature. However, after achieving recognition for Tropic of Death, Walrond left New York City and faded into obscurity.

In praising the book, David Levering-Lewis says ““It’s a gorgeous book, and it’s detective work that is really exceptional.” Walrond was born in Guyana and his role in the Harlem Renaissance reflects the important place Caribbean-Americans have had in the history of Harlem.

For more on the book, we’re very excited about an event with James Davis to celebrate the book’s launch at Greenlight Books in Brooklyn, on Monday, February 23rd.

And here’s an excerpt from the book:

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