Book Giveaway! Society for Cinema and Media Studies 2020!

This week we are bringing our Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) book exhibit to you, and we’re kicking off our virtual booth events with a book giveaway!

To enter our drawing, complete all required fields in the form at the bottom of this post by midnight on Wednesday, April 8.

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Making Worlds

Affect and Collectivity in Contemporary European Cinema

Claudia Breger

Claudia Breger’s Making Worlds is a vital contribution to the political dimensions of contemporary film and media theory. Breger’s meticulous readings of contemporary cinema create generative openings in impasses that have petrified debate over the past three decades, developing models of cinematic worldmaking for critically feeling out the possibilities of creative assemblage and collective assembly in the face of authoritarian enclosure and humanitarian crisis.

~James Leo Cahill, University of Toronto

 

Claudia Breger argues that contemporary European cinema provides ways of thinking about and feeling collectivity that can challenge the twenty-first century’s political trends. Through a new model of cinematic worldmaking, Making Worlds examines how films produce unexpected and destabilizing affects that invite viewers to imagine new connections.

What Is Japanese Cinema?

A History

Yomota Inuhiko. Translated by Philip Kaffen.

A compact, breezy, and stimulating summary of Japanese film history. . . . Yomota’s book offers something largely absent from English-language writing about Japanese cinema: a Japanese perspective.

~Kazu Watanabe, Film Comment

What Is Japanese Cinema? is a concise and lively history of Japanese film that shows how cinema tells the story of Japan’s modern age. Discussing popular works alongside auteurist masterpieces, Yomota Inuhiko considers films in light of both Japanese cultural particularities and cinema as a worldwide art form.

Anxious Cinephilia

Pleasure and Peril at the Movies

Sarah Keller

Anxious Cinephilia gives us the most far-reaching theorization of cinephilia yet. This exploration of desire and anxiety as twin impulses unearths novel connections across film cultures, affective states, and moments of technological change, from early cinema to cinematic spectacle in the digital era. Keller produces a fascinating remapping of the shifting relationship between the spectator and the beloved object and refashions cinephilia for our anxious times.

~Belén Vidal, author of Heritage Film: Nation, Genre, and Representation

The advent of new screening practices and viewing habits in the twenty-first century has spurred debate over what it means to be a “cinephile.” Sarah Keller places these competing visions in historical and theoretical perspective, tracing how the love of movies intertwines with anxieties over the content and impermanence of cinematic images.

Flaming Creatures

Constantine Verevis

Wallflower Press

Constantine Verevis’s Flaming Creatures dissects and maps with great affection the tangled network of intertextual appropriations Jack Smith performed in his landmark film. While the film has provoked censorship and admiration, scorn and expressions of the sublime, Verevis reveals Smith’s “secret-flix” in rich detail, illuminating both aesthetic and cultural confrontations that now mark the transition to contemporary cinema. A feast of historical and filmic information.

~Janet Staiger, author of Perverse Spectators: The Practices of Film Reception

The advent of new screening practices and viewing habits in the twenty-first century has spurred debate over what it means to be a “cinephile.” Sarah Keller places these competing visions in historical and theoretical perspective, tracing how the love of movies intertwines with anxieties over the content and impermanence of cinematic images.

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